“Keeping AIDS in the Headlines: Maintaining Focus, Expanding Priorities”

View pictures from the Summit
Summit Recap – DAY 1

Summit Recap – Day 2

At this year’s summit we explored what it means to be an HIV funder in 2019, discussing topics such as:

  • What is the way forward, AIDS exceptionalism or AIDS mainstreaming?
  • How and why do funders center HIV within other priorities?
  • How do funders measure success when funding HIV work that intersects with other drivers?

This year’s theme – and our new venue – also presented an opportunity to look at HIV-related funding through a unique lens. Media – in all its forms – has the power both to reach the communities most impacted by HIV, as well as to inform and amplify our work. It is also a platform that can be used to ensure that HIV/AIDS stays top-of-mind, even as funding and programming becomes increasingly integrated.

Our media focus will explore the role of funders in:

  • Ensuring AIDS remains in the headlines;
  • Using the media to effectively address HIV care, prevention, and treatment; and
  • Successfully countering media inaccuracies about HIV/AIDS.

Schedule

Monday
October 28
11:30 am
Registration
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm
Opening Lunch
12:30 pm - 12:45 pm
Summit Welcome
12:45 pm - 2:00 pm
Plenary - Why Media Matters
Session Organizer: Kaiser Family Foundation
+More Info
12:45 pm - 2:00 pm
Ballroom
Plenary - Why Media Matters

Media shape perceptions of HIV in all the communities where we work. As funders, we can harness the unparalleled power of media to reach large audiences and also leverage the latest digital platforms to focus on specific disproportionately-affected priority populations, so that we can direct our resources to accurately inform, connect to services, shape attitudes, and build community. This session will review the changing media landscape and delve into the ways that HIV is portrayed by news outlets, entertainment media, social media users, and public health campaigns to amplify community voices and guide efforts to end the HIV epidemic.

Speakers

Robbyn Kistler
Robbyn Kistler has worked with the Kaiser Family Foundation since 2007 as a consultant for their media partnerships and health communications program. She serves primarily as a liaison to health departments in the Southern U.S., helping them leverage Kaiser's public information campaigns, including Greater Than AIDS. She supports local efforts for ending the HIV epidemic by guiding strategy and coordinating media placements on billboards, broadcast, and social media. Before her current career, Robbyn grew up Quaker in rural Pennsylvania, majored in Soviet Studies at Oberlin College, played in a professional Caribbean steel band in Seattle, and ran a USAID-funded grantmaking program in Russia. She is now based in Brooklyn, a proud mom of two teen girls and a loving ally of queer people of color. She serves on the board of Atlanta-based He Is Valuable, Inc.
Kenyon Farrow
Kenyon Farrow is a writer, editor, and strategist. His expertise is in public health, health care, social safety net and social justice. Kenyon has also worked on campaigns large and small, local, national, and global on issues related to criminalization/mass imprisonment, homelessness, and LGBT rights. He is a sought after speaker, editor and group facilitator for social justice campaigns and organizations. He is currently the senior editor with TheBody.com and TheBodyPro.com.  Prior to joining TheBody.com, he served as U.S. & Global Health Policy director with Treatment Action Group (TAG). He is also known for his work with organizations such as Queers for Economic Justice, Critical Resistance, and FIERCE! In addition to his political work, Kenyon is a prolific essayist and author. He is the co-editor of the book Letters From Young Activists: Today’s Rebels Speak Out. His work has also appeared in many anthologies including Spirited: Affirming the Soul of Black Lesbian and Gay IdentityFor Colored Boys Who Have Considered Suicide When The Rainbow Is Still Not EnoughWe Have Not Been Moved: Resisting Racism and Militarism in 21st Century America, and Black Gay Genius: Answering Joseph Beam’s Call. His work has also appeared on websites and in publications such as The Body.com, POZ, The Atlantic, TheGrio, Colorlines, ReWire NewsThe American Prospect, and AlterNet. Kenyon’s work has been recognized by many institutions including Out Magazine’s “Out 100” and The Advocate magazine’s “40 Under 40.” He was also named a “Modern Black History Hero” by Black Entertainment Television.
DaShawn Usher
DaShawn Usher is an award-winning advocate, published researcher, and celebrated leader within the LGBTQ+ community and HIV prevention field. DaShawn joined GLAAD as the Program Officer, Communities of Color with more than 12 years of extensive experience in LGBT research, program development and design, campaigns, and health communications. He was featured in OUT magazine’s 2017 OUT 100 list for his efforts in community organizing. DaShawn has been listed on the 2017 and 2018 DBQ Magazine’s LOUD 100 People of Color list, recognized by NYC Pride as a 2018 Community Hero, and received the 2019 Fighter Award by Heir Productions. DaShawn is a graduate of Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU), where he majored in Mass Communications/Public Relations. While at MTSU, DaShawn worked at Nashville CARES as the Young Brothers United Coordinator serving LGBTQ+ youth of color. Following Nashville CARES, he ventured into research that focused on the LGBTQ+ community with the Research Foundation of the City University of New York (RFCUNY). He continued his research experience with the New York Blood Center’s Project ACHIEVE through clinical (HIV vaccines and Injectable PrEP) and behavioral research, with a focus on Black men who have sex with men (MSM). More recently, DaShawn served as the Senior Manager, Community Mobilization at GLSEN working towards building capacity across the volunteer network for safe and inclusive schools. DaShawn is also the founder and Executive Director of Mobilizing Our Brothers Initiative (MOBI), a series of curated social connectivity events for gay and queer people of color to see their holistic self while promoting community, wellness, and personal development. MOBI has engaged more than 4,500 people in New York City, Newark, N.J., Atlanta, GA and Birmingham, AL. MOBI’s wellness initiatives are featured in over 50 media articles ranging from Cassius, Nylon, TENz, NBC News, Out, BLEU, The Root, HIVEqual, to PBS Newshour. DaShawn is a proud mentor to some of the brightest emerging minds around the country and continues to learn and grow from his mentees, colleagues, and community.
2:00 pm - 2:15 pm
Break
2:15 pm - 3:30 pm
Plenary - Finding the Words: Media Messaging and Strategy for HIV Justice
Session Designer: HIV Justice Network, Prevention Access Campaign, AIDS United and Avert
+More Info
2:15 pm - 3:30 pm
Ballroom
Plenary - Finding the Words: Media Messaging and Strategy for HIV Justice

Now that we have established “why media matters”, we will examine the ways in which strategic interventions can start conversations, change narratives, correct misconceptions and anchor critical advocacy and prevention initiatives. Using HIV criminalization, the U=U campaign, and harm reduction as case studies, this session will work to answer:

  • What are the dominant narrative frames in media coverage of HIV, and how are they evolving (or not);
  • Where and how are people affected by HIV communicating today, in terms of media interventions;
  • How can HIV justice activists meaningfully engage with journalists and media outlets of all types;
  • How does access to more interactive communication technology and social media have an impact on the HIV media response;
  • What are the dynamics of media created by grassroots organizations vs mainstream media; and
  • How can funders support strategic media interventions about HIV and help to change the conversation?

The panel will share different perspectives, strategies and concrete tools – centered on lived experiences – to combat stigma and mobilize HIV justice worldwide.

Speakers

Kate Harrison
Kate Harrison is head of programme funding at Avert. Kate has over 20 years’ experience in health, HIV and international development, including work in Uganda, Kenya, Ghana, Zimbabwe, Tanzania, India and Cambodia. Kate has several years’ experience in funding international health and HIV, with particular expertise in community-based approaches to support maternal and child health, including HIV and sexual and reproductive health. Prior to Avert, Kate led the Children’s Investment Fund Foundation’s HIV work, including managing partnerships with the Presidents Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) and the Global Fund for AIDS, TB and Malaria (GFATM). Before joining CIFF in June 2015, Kate was a Senior Manager in the International Grants Team at Comic Relief for seven years, with oversight for Health and HIV. She led the development of Comic Relief’s first health strategy, and a revision to the HIV strategy to include a greater focus on the leadership of people living with HIV. Kate was Senior Technical Advisor for Children at the International HIV/AIDS Alliance for seven years. She led the development of guidance on community-based approaches to support children affected by HIV and AIDS, including the interactive online resource www.ovcsupport.net, a set of guidance notes for community workers called ‘Building Blocks’ which was adapted and translated into six languages, and a book published by Macmillan publishers: ‘Building Hope’. She is a co-founder of the Coalition for Children Affected by AIDS www.ccaba.org, a member of the Private Foundations Constituency of the Global Fund for AIDS, TB and Malaria, and was on the Steering Committee for the Global Plan for Elimination of Mother to Child Transmission. Kate serves on the FCAA Board of Directors
Bruce Richman
Bruce is the founding executive director of Prevention Access Campaign which launched Undetectable = Untransmittable (U=U), a global community-driven movement with over 900 official partners in 99 countries sharing the revolutionary but largely unknown fact: people living with HIV on treatment with an undetectable viral load cannot transmit HIV to sexual partners. In 2012, nine years after his diagnosis, Bruce learned U=U. After recognizing that people with HIV and the public were not being informed about this groundbreaking science, he joined with activists and researchers to ensure the science reaches the people it was intended to benefit. U=U is based on the principle that all people with HIV have a right to accurate and meaningful information about their social, sexual, and reproductive health based on science not stigma. Bruce and the U=U campaign have been featured extensively in national and international media including The Washington Post, CBS Evening News, China Global Television, CNN, The Guardian, Daily Mail, CBC Canada, South Africa Medical Digest, JAMA and The Lancet. Bruce was honored as Healthline magazine's HIV "2017 Person of the Year", received the 2017 Partnership Award from the National Alliance of State & Territorial AIDS Directors (NASTAD), and was recognized by Plus Magazine as "#1 Most Amazing HIV+ People of 2018." In 2019, Bruce received the Red Ribbon Award from the people with HIV network of Vietnam, and the U.S. Congress honored Prevention Access Campaign and U=U with official congressional recognition. Bruce has worked in philanthropy and social change for over twenty-five years developing cause-related initiatives for high profile people and brands. He received his master’s in education from Harvard Graduate of School of Education and his law degree from Harvard Law School.
Janet Butler-McPhee
Janet Butler-McPhee is the Director of Communications and Advocacy for the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network, an organization that promotes the human rights of people living with, at risk of, or affected by HIV or AIDS, in Canada and around the world. At the Legal Network, she oversees all bilingual strategic communications programming and campaigns, advocacy interventions, community outreach, media relations, event planning and brand management, among others. Janet was also co-producer on the Legal Network’s documentaries, Positive Women: Exposing Injustice and Consent: HIV Non-Disclosure and Sexual Assault Law. She is currently the principal investigator on a new research grant working with people who use drugs, and has contributed extensively to media on topics including HIV criminalization, harm reduction and LGBTQI rights.  Janet is also a communications advisor to HIV Justice Worldwide, a global coalition — of which the Legal Network is a founding member — that campaigns to end HIV criminalization to abolish criminal and similar laws, policies and practices that regulate, control and punish people living with HIV based on their HIV-positive status. Prior to her work in the HIV sector, Janet’s work focused on public health advocacy and behaviour change communications in support of reproductive rights and health care in development and humanitarian contexts. Janet holds a Master of Science degree in Strategic Communications from Columbia University in New York.  
Zachary Ford
Zachary Ford is a program manager at AIDS United where he oversees the organization’s harm reduction portfolio, including the Syringe Access Fund. In this role, he manages the grant-making initiative and works closely with grantees to deliver tailored technical assistance and capacity building, focusing on topics such as meaningful involvement of people who use drugs, media relations, harm reduction 101, federal and private funding opportunities, and grant writing. Zachary contributes to research and resource development. He is a lead researcher and author on The Right Hit: Developing Effective Media Strategies at Syringe Services Programs and Bringing Safer Consumption Spaces to the United States. In 2018, Zachary compiled an analytical report on the challenges and lessons from syringe services programs in the United States using data from Syringe Access Fund grantee final reports. Zachary also contributed to AIDS United’s Meaningful Involvement of People Who Use Drugs fact sheet. Currently, Zachary is preparing to publish a toolkit on harm reduction and stimulants. Zachary is a graduate of Centre College in Danville, Kentucky with a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology. His studies focused on the sociology of human rights movements and the law and policy that propelled and/or resulted from these movements.
Naina Khanna
Naina Khanna is a national speaker, trainer, and advocate who has worked in the HIV field since 2005, following her HIV diagnosis in 2002. She currently serves on the Board of Directors for AIDS United, as a member of the Women’s HIV Research Initiative, and served on President Obama’s Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS (PACHA) from 2010 – 2014. Prior to working in HIV, Naina co-founded and served as National Field Director for the League of Pissed Off Voters, a progressive national organization working to expand participation of young people and communities of color in electoral politics. She is currently pursuing a PhD in Medical Sociology at the University of California – San Francisco.
3:30 pm - 3:45 pm
Break
3:45 pm - 5:00 pm
Plenary - The Art of Storytelling in the HIV Response
+More Info
3:45 pm - 5:00 pm
Ballroom
Plenary - The Art of Storytelling in the HIV Response

To close out the day’s focus on media and messaging, this plenary will zoom in on the role that storytelling can play in communicating about, and advocating for, the needs of people impacted by HIV. Through a facilitated conversation we will explore the role that different storytelling mediums – traditional journalism, television, social media, and media partnerships and advocacy – can play in shaping culture, fighting stigma, and changing attitudes and behaviors toward HIV/AIDS. Importantly this panel will also tackle the role of strategic philanthropy to initiate, measure, and scale up these initiatives.

Speakers

Regan Hofmann
Regan Hofmann serves as the Director, a.i., of the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) U.S. Liaison Office in Washington, D.C. Ms. Hofmann leads strategic collaborations between UNAIDS and the Executive and Congressional branches of the U.S. government to advance strong U.S. support for the global response to HIV/AIDS. She was formerly the Senior Policy Officer at UNAIDS U.S. Liaison Office. Ms. Hofmann’s career includes prior positions in network news, advertising and publishing. She worked at CBS News, the advertising agencies Young & Rubicam and Saatchi & Saatchi and as the editor-in-chief of several print/digital media outlets. In 2006, ten years after being diagnosed with HIV, she was named to the helm of POZ, a then U.S.-based print magazine for people living with HIV/AIDS. Ms. Hofmann took the brand digital, and global, growing its monthly audience from 50,000 domestic readers to more than a million readers around the world—including many people living with, or at risk for, HIV. Ms. Hofmann served as an advisor to the U.S. CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV, Viral Hepatitis and STD Prevention and Treatment. In 2006 and 2011, she was appointed to the U.S delegation to the United Nations’ General Assembly’s Special Session on HIV/AIDS. She served for ten years as a trustee of amfAR (the Foundation for AIDS Research). Building on her background in media, Ms. Hofmann works to help increase the visibility of the continued need to address the AIDS pandemic and to reduce HIV-related stigma. She has given a TEDx talk, appeared on CNN, “The Doctors,” C-SPAN, NBC, “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” and ABC’s “Good Morning America” as well as in The New York Times, Marie Claire, New York and Vogue, among others. Ms. Hofmann has addressed audiences at Congressional briefings, universities, AIDS fundraisers and the White House. In 2008, Ms. Hofmann traveled to Taiwan, Vietnam and Australia as part of the U.S. Department of State’s U.S. Specialists and Embassy Speaker Program. She has participated in various U.S. national HIV/AIDS awareness campaigns and appeared in several films on HIV/AIDS. Her memoir about living with HIV, I Have Something to Tell You, was published in 2009 by Simon and Schuster. Ms. Hofmann is a native of Princeton, NJ and received a B.A. from Trinity College in Connecticut.
Georgia Arnold
Georgia Arnold is Senior Vice President of Social Responsibility at Viacom International Media Networks and the Executive Director of MTV Staying Alive Foundation. Ms. Arnold co-founded MTV Staying Alive in 1998, and originally sat as a Board Member, until she was appointed as Executive Director in October 2007.  MTV Staying Alive is a US and UK charity, set up to tell stories to save lives, creating movements with purpose to improve young people’s health and well-being globally. Over the last two decades Ms Arnold has established a strong track record of pioneering the use of mass media for purposeful behavior-change and demand-creation on HIV and reproductive health issues affecting young people worldwide, including the “Staying Alive” documentaries, the award-winning “Meeting Mandela”, as well as conceiving and creating the multi-award winning campaign ‘MTV Shuga’, on-going since 2009 across Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, Cote d’Ivoire and India. As Senior Vice President of Social Responsibility for Viacom International, Ms Arnold is responsible for developing social initiatives for Viacom’s portfolio of brands internationally. She has conceived & led campaigns such as MTV Breaks, which help young talent get their first break in the creative industries; MTV Voices an initiative encouraging young people to use their voice to create change; and leads on how to implement cross-brand campaigns for Viacom International on equality, diversity and inclusion, such as International Women’s Day, Pride Month, Black History Month and International Day of People with Disabilities. Since 2017, Ms Arnold has been the co- Champion of ‘Fusion’, Viacom’s ERG on Cultural Diversity.  Ms Arnold regularly gives key note speeches and Ted X talks around the world.
Morris Singletary
Morris Anthony Singletary of Atlanta, GA is a Dillard University graduate. He has worked from the classroom to community. After being diagnosed with HIV in 2006 life drastically changed.  I’m December of 2015 the co-founder of a THRIVE (SS) put Morris in the The support group.  It was that moment when Morris regained strength and life.  I’m December of 2016 Morris went on Facebook live with #HIVandME this quickly picked up love from around the world. Today you can find Morris sharing, teaching, preventing, and caring for anyone he comes in contact with. His vow is to be a life long Peer Educator as long as HIV is around. You can follow Morris on social media under poZitive2poSitive
Steven Thrasher
Steven Thrasher, Ph.D., (he/him) is the inaugural Daniel H. Renberg chair of social justice in reporting at Northwestern’s Medill School, the first journalism professorship in the world to focus on LGBTQ issues. He is also a core faculty member of the Institute of Sexual Gender and Minority Health and Wellbeing at the Feinberg School of Medicine. A former staff writer for the Village Voice and writer-at-large for the Guardian, his journalism has been published in the New York Times, Nation, Atlantic, Out, Advocate, Inside Higher Education, NPR, Teen Vogue, LitHub, and Esquire. For five years, Dr. Thrasher covered the prosecution of Michael Johnson for BuzzFeed News, which—along with his coverage of the Black Lives Matter movement in Missouri—formed the basis of his dissertation on race and the criminalization of HIV/AIDS. His research has been supported by grants from the Ford and Alfred P. Sloan Foundations, and he’s been named Journalist of the Year Award (National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association). In 2017, he was inducted into the Hall of Fame of the American Sociological Association’s journal Contexts. He holds a PhD in American Studies from New York University. Twitter: @thrasherxy
Chris Ridley
Chris Ridley is the Director of Corporate Social Responsibility Communications at Gilead Sciences. In this role, he drives communications and engagement around the company’s philanthropic efforts, including the COMPASS Initiative, a more than $100M, 10-year commitment to support community organizations working to address the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the Southern United States; Age Positively, an effort to fund innovative approaches to aging with HIV; HepConnect, a viral hepatis philanthropic program focused on the greater Appalachia region of the Unites States; and TRANSCend, which will support Trans-led organizations working to improve the safety, health and wellness of the Transgender community. Most recently, he was pleased to help launch the RADIAN Initiative, a partnership between Gilead and the Elton John AIDS Foundation focusing on Eastern Europe and Central Asia. Chris is a strong believer that the role of a funder is to elevate and support partners working on the frontlines and that community-led storytelling is key to bringing forth structural change. Prior to his time with Gilead, Chris worked in consulting, politics, and the biotech industry. A native of New Jersey, he has a J.D. from Albany Law School and resides in San Francisco.
5:15 pm - 7:00 pm
Reception
Tuesday
October 29
8:00 am - 8:45 am
Registration and Breakfast
9:00 am - 9:15 am
Welcome
9:15 pm - 10:30 am
Plenary - Hacks from the Frontline: Sex Worker-Sourced Strategies for Creative and Responsive HIV Funding
Session Designer: Third Wave Fund, UHAI, Red Umbrella Fund
+More Info
9:15 pm - 10:30 am
Ballroom
Plenary - Hacks from the Frontline: Sex Worker-Sourced Strategies for Creative and Responsive HIV Funding

Communities on the frontlines of the HIV/AIDS epidemic are facing new and mounting attacks. In today’s political climate, we need increased funding across issues and to employ innovative strategies that center criminalized communities, especially sex workers, LGBTQI+ people, and people of color.

Where and how can HIV funders draw strategy from the nimbleness and creativity of movement organizers? How can we be more receptive and responsive to the needs and experiences of people most impacted by oppression? How can HIV funding help to reduce the harms of criminalization, stigma, violence, and oppression? This interactive workshop will explore these questions by drawing on insights from the only three participatory funds globally by-and-for sex workers (UHAI EASHRI, Red Umbrella Fund, and Third Wave Fund’s Sex Worker Giving Circle). We will be joined by representatives from Open Society Foundations, HIPS (Washington, D.C.), and the Bar Hostess Empowerment and Support Programme (Nairobi, Kenya) to collectively explore real-life examples of funder practices that respond to frontline needs.

Together, we’ll share successful tactics for matching movement creativity and resilience, even while navigating rigid systems or the limitations of restricted funding. We’ll examine opportunities to build in more flexible grantmaking criteria and processes, get inventive with reporting requirements, and show up for frontline communities to support their shifting needs in oppressive environments. We’ll offer a checklist of creative funding strategies before using these ideas to brainstorm responses to challenging scenarios across funding settings.

Speakers

Julia Lukomnik
Julia Lukomnik is a program officer with the Open Society Foundation’s (OSF) Public Health Program. In this role, she supports civil society organizations change the root causes of vulnerability that sex workers and trans communities face. This includes reducing stigma and discrimination, securing access to health services and legal representation, changing harmful policies and laws, and engaging in political education. Julia led the drive to unionize OSF’s U.S. offices and was part of the group that bargained OSF’s first contract. Prior to joining OSF in 2014, Julia consulted for various organizations in Uruguay, including the United Nations Development Programme and the Ministry of Social Development, to promote the economic and social inclusion of trans and sex worker communities. In her free time, Julia loves to bike around New York City, bury her nose in a good novel, and dance to tango, salsa, or eight rhythms. Someday she’ll get around to writing the book she’s been contemplating for years. Julia holds a postgraduate degree in health policy and administration and an undergraduate degree in sociology and global health technology.
Maryse Mitchell-Brody
Maryse Mitchell-Brody is a white Jewish queer non-binary facilitator, fundraiser, organizer, and radical social worker. They have been active in movements for healing justice, sex worker organizing, racial justice, economic justice, and LGBTQI+ liberation in their hometown of New York City for over twenty years, including work with The Icarus Project, the Rock Dove Collective, the Allied Media Conference, and Resource Generation. In 2018, Maryse co-organized the Sex Worker Giving Circle, the first and only sex worker-led fund housed at a U.S. foundation. They joined Third Wave’s staff this year as the Sex Worker Funding Officer in order to support sex worker movements through participatory grantmaking, leadership development, and philanthropic advocacy. Maryse lives in Brooklyn, where they keep company with their partners and community, their dog Smoky, and too many houseplants.
Peninah Mwangi
Peninah Mwangi is the Executive Director of Bar Hostess Empowerment and Support Programme (BHESP) in Nairobi, Kenya. She holds an MA in Entrepreneurship and a BA in Sociology, both from Kenyatta University. Peninah is one of the founding members of BHESP, a community-led organization serving both sex workers and bar hostesses in Kenya since 1998. Peninah has been active in human and sex workers rights advocacy at national, regional and global levels, representing sex workers in various UN high level meetings, with WHO and as a member of the Network of Sex Work Projects. She has also been involved in movement building as a leader with both the Kenya Sex Workers Alliance (KESWA) and the African Sex Workers Alliance (ASWA). Peninah has served on participatory grantmaking panels with Red Umbrella Fund and UHAI-EASHRI.
Tamika Spellman
Tamika is the Policy and Advocacy Associate with HIPS. She is originally from Buffalo New York but has lived in Washington D.C. on and off since 1988. Tamika has worked with HIPS since June 2017. She has served as a peer educator then worked as a part of the needle exchange program.  She has volunteered her time with mobile services giving new works and safer sex supplies to people throughout the District. Tamika knows first hand what the war on drugs has done to the community. She is dedicated to helping others and working to create positive policies and laws to help those involved in sex work and drug use. She has testified on behalf of HIPS at the D.C. Council, spoken on several harm reduction panels, and is very active in both SWAC and the DC LEAD Coalition. Tamika is a 2019 Advisor to the Sex Worker Giving Circle at Third Wave Fund.
Vera Rodriguez
Vera Rodriguez joined the Red Umbrella Fund team in August 2017 as Programme Associate. Vera was born in Spain where she graduated in Journalism at Universidad CEU San Pablo of Valencia. In 2000 she moved to London and worked in a Peep Show in Soho to pay for her BA in Photographic Arts at  Westminster University. In 2011 she volunteered for the First Sex Worker Film festival in London and since then, she has combined activism, art, photography, performance and sex work. She is an active member of X-talk organisation for 10 years, has been very involved with East London Strippers Collective and she is a cast member of the Sex Workers Opera. Vera worked at Sexual Health on Call in London as a Multilingual Migrant Support Worker and has shot feminist porn for Erika Lust productions. Vera shares her life with a little dog, believes in community, creativity and social change and defines herself as a ‘Puta Feminista’.  She speaks English, Spanish, Catalan, Portuguese and Italian.
Stellah Bosire
Stellah Bosire is the Co-Executive Director of UHAI-EASHRI Africa’s first indigenous activist fund for and by sex workers, LGBTI people which supports civil society organizing across 7 East and Central African states and pan-African organizing addressing; poverty, violence, ensuring that education, employment, housing, and healthcare are accessible to all, without prejudice while fighting oppression and injustice daily through changing legislation, landscapes, and lives. Her expertise both locally and internationally is in Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights focusing on vulnerable populations- sex workers, people who inject drugs, LGBTIQ and people living with HIV/AIDS influencing laws, policies and programs beyond Kenya.
10:30 am - 10:45 am
Break
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
East Wing
(International) Responsible Transitioning: What Role Should Philanthropists Play
Session Designer: Frontline AIDS
+More Info
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
East Wing
(International) Responsible Transitioning: What Role Should Philanthropists Play

As funders, our ultimate goal is for national governments to take our place and to fund a comprehensive package of HIV prevention and treatment services for everyone who needs them. What we want to avoid is the kind of disruption or cessation of services that occurs when donors cease funding key programmes abruptly and without a clear plan for hand over. Many governments are reluctant to fund services for Key Populations that are criminalised, such as needle exchange services for drug users, or condom distribution services for sex workers. Moreover, if budgets are squeezed, prevention services are usually the first to be cut, and civil society organisations find it harder to secure funds for advocacy or to hold governments to account. This session, designed by Frontline AIDS and the Joep Lange Institute, will highlight some of the critical services and programmes that philanthropists may need to keep supporting at community level as governments take over responsibility for HIV services previously funded by donors.

Speakers

Gillian Holmes
Gillian Holmes: Gillian Holmes has been the Director of Funding and Engagement at Frontline AIDS since 2017. She has had a long and varied career in international development and global public health, starting out initially as a Planning Adviser to the Ministry of Health in eSwatini, and then joining DFID as a Health Economist in the late 1980s. She joined WHO to manage the External Review of WHO’s Global Programme on AIDS in 1990, and was instrumental in guiding the implementation of recommendations stemming from this Review, which led to the creation of UNAIDS in 1992. After a brief stint at the World Bank and UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office advising on the design of health sector assistance to countries of the Former Soviet Union, Gillian joined the UN to work on a range of HIV and women’s rights programmes at UNAIDS, UNIFEM and the Office of the High Commission for Human Rights. She is an economist by training and a women’s rights activist at heart.
David Barr
David Barr: David began working on HIV/AIDS issues in 1985. The scope of David’s work has included treatment access and clinical research, addressing stigma and discrimination, HIV prevention policy, HIV funding structures, drug policy, strategic planning, facilitation and program evaluation.  In 2003, David coordinated the creation of the HIV Collaborative Fund and the International Treatment Preparedness Coalition (ITPC) at the Tides Foundation. Since 1987, David has served in senior policy positions at Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund, Gay Men’s Health Crisis, the Forum for Collaborative HIV Research at the George Washington University School of Public Health, and the Drug Policy Alliance. David has served in a number of capacities, including as a member of the AIDS Roundtable of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), the Global Fund for AIDS, TB and Malaria Technical Evaluation Review Group (TERG), the US Public Health Service Panel to Set Guidelines for the Use Anti-Retroviral Drugs, and the Executive Committee of the US NIH AIDS Clinical Trial Group (ACTG). David was a founding member of the Treatment Action Group and the ACT UP Treatment and Data Group. As a Senior Consultant with the Fremont Center, clients include the Global Fund, UNAIDS, Elton John AIDS Foundation, AmFAR, the Ford Foundation, New York City Department of Health, New York State AIDS Institute, Open Society Foundations, the Robert Carr Network Fund, AIDS Fonds Netherlands and UNDP. He is currently working with the Joep Lange Institute on the project Ensuring Efforts to Scale Up, Strengthen and Sustain the Global AIDS Response and with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation on a project to address the increasing HIV needs of underserved populations in sub-Saharan Africa. He is a native New Yorker.
Pavlo Smyrnov
Pavlo Smyrnov is Deputy Executive Director of Alliance for Public Health in Ukraine (previously International HIV/AIDS Alliance in Ukraine). He  has been with the Alliance since  2002 and has been engaged in developing and implementing interventions to improve HIV case-finding as well as improving linkage to ART for key populations in Ukraine, mostly people who inject drugs, sex workers and men who have sex with men. Pavlo has over 15 years of experience in managing nation wide health programs in the context of a concentrated HIV epidemic. In the past few years he has been involved in transitioning HIV services for key population from donor to goverment funding.
Matthew MacGregor
Matthew MacGregor is the Senior Manager for Sustainability, Transition, and Co-Financing at the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria. Since 2016, Matthew has led the Global Fund’s overall work on sustainability and transition from external financing, and oversees the implementation of the Sustainability, Transition, and Co-Financing (STC) policy. Matthew previously worked as a Global Fund “Fund Portfolio Manager” (FPM), managing Global Fund grants in the Latin American and Caribbean region. Before joining the Global Fund in 2014, Matthew worked in a variety of capacities in health and development in Latin America, South East Asia, and the US, including as the Executive Director of a US-based health NGO. He holds a Master degree from the Fletcher School at Tufts University.
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
West Wing
(Domestic U.S.) Ending the HIV Epidemic: A Plan for America Leveraging Lessons from D.C.
Session Designer: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
+More Info
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
West Wing
(Domestic U.S.) Ending the HIV Epidemic: A Plan for America Leveraging Lessons from D.C.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is proposing a once-in-a-generation opportunity to eliminate new HIV infections in our nation.  The Ending the HIV Epidemic initiative will target resources to the 48 highest burden counties, Washington, D.C., San Juan, Puerto Rico, and 7 states with a substantial rural HIV burden. CDC will work closely with other HHS agencies, local and state governments, communities, and people with HIV to expand key HIV prevention strategies.  The D.C. Department of Health paints the picture of how much progress can be made toward ending the HIV epidemic by using evidence-based interventions such as population-focused HIV testing, treatment as prevention, condom distribution, needle exchange, and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). The session will also highlight new data and resources to support the national effort to end HIV, such as amfAR’s new “Ending the HIV Epidemic” database.

Speakers

Jonathan Mermin
Jonathan Mermin, MD, MPH, is the Director of the National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP), and a Rear Admiral in the U.S. Public Health Service. He oversees the nation’s efforts to prevent HIV, viral hepatitis, sexually transmitted diseases, and tuberculosis. From 2009-2013, Dr. Mermin directed CDC’s Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, overseeing the agency’s HIV efforts in the United States. He previously served as Director of CDC-Kenya and HHS Public Health Attaché for the U.S. Embassy from 2006-2009, and as Director of CDC-Uganda from 1999-2006. Dr. Mermin began his career at CDC in 1995 as an EIS officer with the Foodborne and Diarrheal Diseases Branch. He completed an internal medicine residency at San Francisco General Hospital and a preventive medicine residency at CDC and the California Department of Health Services. He is a graduate of Harvard College and Stanford University School of Medicine, and received his MPH from Emory University. He currently serves as an Adjunct Professor at Emory University School of Public Health.
Michael Kharfen
Michael Kharfen has 30 years of experience in public health and human services with federal and local governments and non-profit organizations. He is the Senior Deputy Director of the HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis, STD and TB Administration in the DC Department of Health. Kharfen developed the District’s condom-distribution program, expanded the District's school-based STD screening program, developed an award-winning awareness and social-marketing program on HIV/AIDS prevention, established an academic detailing program on HIV and hepatitis testing and implemented innovative programs to promote HIV prevention among older adults and via peer education among youth. Among his priorities are, in collaboration with community partners, developing and implementing the 90-90-90-50 by 2020 plan for ending the HIV epidemic; enhancing the health outcomes for persons living with HIV on the care continuum; promoting innovative and home-grown large-scale prevention strategies, including Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP); improving the timeliness and breadth of data on the epidemics; redesigning the HIV housing program; expanding sexual and TB health services; and strategies to eradicate hepatitis C. Prior to his current position, he served as the Bureau Chief for Partnerships, Community Outreach and Capacity Building and Interim Bureau Chief for STD/TB Control. Previous to District Government, he worked at Fight Crime: Invest in Kids, M&R Strategic Services, U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families, and served as the director of community affairs for New York City Mayor David N. Dinkins. He is a recipient of a 2013 Cafritz Award for Distinguished DC Government Employees.
Greg Millett
Greg Millett is a nationally recognized epidemiologist/researcher with significant experience working in federal HIV policy development at both the White House and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). From 2009 to 2011, Mr. Millett served as a detailee in the White House Office of National AIDS Policy as a Senior Policy Advisor. In this role, he coordinated the Office’s policy and research activities, including HIV prevention policy and the federal-level inter-agency process to develop the National AIDS Strategy. Prior to joining amfAR in May 2014, Mr. Millett served as the HHS/CDC Liaison to the White House Office of National AIDS Policy. Mr. Millett has published over 40 peer-reviewed research papers. He has a Master of Public Health degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Lindsey Dawson
Lindsey Dawson is Associate Director of HIV Policy at the Kaiser Family Foundation. Ms. Dawson conducts research and analysis on domestic HIV policy. Her work focuses on how health systems, insurance coverage, and federal funding impact access to care for people with HIV and the programs that serve them. Ms. Dawson also focuses on LGBT health policy issues, particularly those related to disparities, access, and coverage. Prior to joining the Foundation, Ms. Dawson was a Policy Associate with The AIDS Institute, where she worked on domestic HIV policy and the ACA. She has also worked on the Foundation’s Medicare team. Ms. Dawson holds a Master’s degree in Public Policy from King’s College London and a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology and Women’s Studies from Smith College.
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Networking Lunch
1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
East Wing
(International) Catalyzing HIV and Family Planning Integration Through Self-Care
Session Designer: Children's Investment Fund Foundation
+More Info
1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
East Wing
(International) Catalyzing HIV and Family Planning Integration Through Self-Care

Self-care, putting health knowledge, tools and decision-making in the hands of users, can radically transform access to healthcare, particularly for HIV prevention and sexual and reproductive health, where stigma and provider bias limit the availability and acceptability of provider-based services. With new tools and technology, from self-testing to self-injection, the time to invest in building the infrastructure and culture of self-care is ripe. Global bodies are setting the policy scene for self-care and rallying the global community around a common vision; however, there is a catalytic role for private philanthropy, with its close connection to social movements, to be leaders in driving a new person-centric approach to services. Private philanthropy can also help generate the evidence needed that self-care can increase access to services, keep people on treatment, and potentially generate health systems cost savings; and provide high-impact models for other donors to scale.

This session aims to:
• Describe what self-care is and the potential impact it could have on offering better integrated services to girls and women and improving health outcomes
• Showcase user experiences and how self-care empowers
• Share promising solutions in HIV and what is needed to scale up
• Explore how private philanthropy can be the catalyst for self-care

Speakers

Taryn Barker
Taryn Barker oversees the HIV portfolio at the Children’s Investment Fund Foundation, where she focuses on adolescent HIV services. Prior to CIFF, she was the Director of Viral Hepatitis at the Clinton Health Access Initiative, where she worked to set up HCV and HBV treatment programmes in LMIC, including micro-elimination programmes for HIV/HCV co-infection programmes. She has a decade of experience in managing health programmmes in Asia, Africa and the Caribbean, primarily focused on access to medicines, devices and diagnostics for infectious diseases, family planning and maternal and neonatal health, as well as on health financing. Taryn holds an MSc in Health Economics from the London School of Economics and a degree in business. Taryn was voted to the Board in the Summer of 2018.
Karen Johnson
Karen Johnson is the Lead: Trusts and Foundations at Frontline AIDS. Karen joined Frontline AIDS as Global Campaign Manager in 2014 and led their Paradise or Persecution campaign for the decriminalisation of LGBT people. She now leads the organisation’s efforts to build and maintain relationships with Trusts and Foundations to advance the strategic objectives of the Alliance. Previously, Karen spent over 11 years at Amnesty International’s Secretariat in London and led the global campaign on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, most specifically for universal ratification of the Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on ESC Rights.
Nina Hasen
As Director of PSI’s HIV and TB Department, Nina Hansen works with her team to support prevention, care and treatment programs in 36 countries across the globe. She believes that PSI’s unique strength as a marketing organization and its private sector expertise makes PSI uniquely poised to address the toughest challenges in HIV and TB. Nina comes to PSI from the US Government, where she oversaw HIV programs funded through the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). Focused on HIV prevention, testing, counseling and gender issues, Nina provided strategic guidance, policy expertise and technical oversight to a range of countries and programs. Nina began her career in grassroots community work, first in London and then the United States, where she focused on women’s health, gender-based violence and youth issues. After discovering a passion for science, Nina pursued a PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in Zoology and conducted post-doctoral work on health disparities between African American and European American women in rates of breast cancer. A fellowship with the American Association for the Advancement of Science brought Nina to Washington, DC in 2009.
Anabel Gomez
Anabel Gomez joined AVAC in 2016 as AVAC’s Global Marketing Manager. Her responsibilities include creating a global platform to help inform development of HIV prevention technologies and accelerate their introduction to market, and she leads a large human-centered design program to inform HIV prevention for adolescent girls and young women. Prior to AVAC Anabel was global social marketing advisor for PSI where she was responsible for supporting the introduction of new products such as HIV self-testing kits, developing programs to drive demand for male circumcision and led innovation in research approaches and operationalization. She is an award-winning journalist and has had papers published. Anabel has worked around the globe for private and public institutions, such as Publicis, Rio Tinto and the European Union. A dual Spanish and Australian national, Anabel is fluent in both languages. She earned a Master’s in business administration from Curtin University in Australia.
Donna McCarraher
Donna McCarraher, PhD, MPH, has 25 years of experience conducting operational and behavioral research in numerous countries and has a decade of experience managing divisions at FHI 360. Currently, Donna serves as the director of FHI 360’s Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health (RMNCH) Division. She has expertise in content areas that include post abortion care (PAC), adolescent health, gender, gender-based violence, adolescents living with HIV, social norms, and the integration of contraception into HIV services.
1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
West Wing
(Domestic U.S.) For Us By Us: The Role of Positive Networks in the HIV Response
Session Organizer: PWN-US, Sero Network
+More Info
1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
West Wing
(Domestic U.S.) For Us By Us: The Role of Positive Networks in the HIV Response

In recent years, there has been a resurgence of “for us by us” networks led by people living with HIV (PLHIV), including in the U.S. national networks such as Latinx+, Positively Trans, Positive Women’s Network-USA, The Reunion Project, Sero, ThriveSS, and the U.S. PLHIV Caucus.

Networks facilitate the creation of collective voices by groups often considered “hard to reach”, including Black gay, bisexual and same-gender loving men; Latinx immigrants; people of trans experience; sex workers; and people living with HIV in rural settings.

Networks support PLHIV to define their own agendas and priorities; to select and hold accountable leadership of their own choosing; to advocate with collective voices for structural interventions by fighting injustice, discrimination and stigma; to advance intersectional policy solutions that benefit the HIV response; and to improve quality of life and health outcomes for PLHIV. The need for intersectional organizing and policy advocacy efforts led by communities most impacted by the epidemic in multiple states has arguably never been greater, and networks are well set up to activate a grassroots base. In recent years, PLHIV networks have been instrumental in winning key victories – including HIV decriminalization in multiple states, and advocacy to save the Affordable Care Act.

In this session we will focus on diverse PLHIV networks as a unique, cost-effective model for supporting leadership development and grassroots community organizing, and how funders can integrate resourcing networks into their work. This will be a dialogue between funders and leaders of networks of people living with HIV.

Speakers

Stanley Wong
Stanley Wong is the senior grants manager for Asia, Middle East and Africa at the Levi Strauss Foundation—an independent, private foundation that conveys the pioneering spirit and enduring values of Levi Strauss & Co.: originality, empathy, integrity, and courage. The Foundation’s mission is to advance the human rights and well-being of underserved people in places where LS&Co. has a business presence. Stan oversees the portfolio of grants awarded to organizations in the region that are driving meaningful change in the areas of HIV/AIDS, social justice, and the rights and well-being of workers in the apparel sector. Prior to joining Levi Strauss in 2007, Stan worked for ten years at the amfAR, the Foundation for AIDS Research, where he helped extend HIV treatment to highly affected communities in the Asia Pacific region. Stan is originally from New York but currently based in Singapore.
Naina Khanna
Naina Khanna is a national speaker, trainer, and advocate who has worked in the HIV field since 2005, following her HIV diagnosis in 2002. She currently serves on the Board of Directors for AIDS United, as a member of the Women’s HIV Research Initiative, and served on President Obama’s Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS (PACHA) from 2010 – 2014. Prior to working in HIV, Naina co-founded and served as National Field Director for the League of Pissed Off Voters, a progressive national organization working to expand participation of young people and communities of color in electoral politics. She is currently pursuing a PhD in Medical Sociology at the University of California – San Francisco.
Kiara St. James
Kiara St. James is the founder and executive director of New York Transgender Advocacy Group. A grass root s 501c-3 Trans-led non-profit organization intent on creating new opportunities for the Transgender and Gender non conforming community of New York state.through diverse partnerships and sustainable initiatives. As a public speaker. She has been instrumental in changing shelter policies that were discriminatory towards the Trans community, and presented workshops concerning emerging communities at the International AIDS Conference in Vienna, Austria and the United Nations, as well as at other conferences and academic institutions.  For the last 17 years Kiara has also been coordinating meetings with legislators to discuss the importance of passing Gender Expression Non Discrimination Act, a bill that will enrich the lives of all New Yorkers through creating culturally affirming spaces. and was finally Legislated into Law January 15 2019  Kiara believes that fight now should be about Equity and shifting of resources  to Trans-led organizations.
Andrew Spieldenner
Andrew Spieldenner (Ph.D., Howard University) is Vice-Chair of the United States People Living with HIV Caucus and Assistant Professor of Health Communication at California State University-San Marcos. Openly living with HIV, Dr. Spieldenner is North American Delegate to UNAIDS.
Sean Strub
Sean Strub is a writer and long-time activist who has been living with HIV almost his entire adult life.  He is the executive director of the Sero Project, a U.S.-based network of PLHIV combating HIV criminalization and promoting the creation and strengthening of PLHIV networks to enable PLHIV to define our own agendas, select and hold accountable leadership of our own choosing and to speak with collective voices. He was been intimately engaged in the PLHIV self-empowerment movement since the first days of the epidemic, initially with the People With AIDS Coalition/NY in the early 80s and later with ACT UP.  In 1990 he was the first openly HIV+ person to run for Congress and in 1994 he founded POZ Magazine and served as its executive editor until 2004.
Larry Scott-Walker
Larry Scott-Walker, Baltimore native, is an author, artist and activist who has had a passion for community from an early age.  Larry moved to Atlanta, GA in 1998 to attend Morehouse College where he would major in African American Studies with a minor in Theater and go on cofound the first and only GSA (Gay Straight Alliance) in the school's history, Safe Space.  In 2004 Larry's play "Reality Amplified" was featured in Jomandi Theater's “Black Diamond Series” and performed in Atlanta.  Larry returned to Baltimore in 2006 where he began work with the Portal Community Center, the city's only Black gay center at the time, as their Programs Manager.  While in Baltimore Larry wrote a column called "Unboxed with Ajar" for the Baltimore OUTLOUD newspaper, held a seat on Baltimore’s Gay Pride planning committee and the City’s Rapid Response Team through the Baltimore AIDS Administration.  Larry returned to Atlanta in 2011 with his sights fixed on continuing the work of championing for the lives of Black gay men. December 12, 2012, Larry published his first book, a compilation of Black gay love poetry, entitled "Love Equation: Pain + Pleasure = Poetry."  November 2013, Larry began working with AID Atlanta's Evolution Project as their Activities and Recruitment Coordinator.  Through his work with Evolution, Larry began to see his passion for HIV advocacy deepen with his acceptance of his own HIV-Positive status.  Larry would publish his second book of poetry in March 2014, Love Equation Vol. 2.  In 2015, at the request of his colleague Daniel Driffin, Larry took on the task of revamping a support group for Black gay men living with HIV in the Atlanta area.  The method used to galvanize and mobilize was so successful that Larry, along with his 2 colleagues, coined the “Undetectables support model” and began to present at conferences around the country on its efficiency.  In 2015, Larry along with Dwain Bridges and Daniel Driffin established THRIVE Support Services Inc., a nonprofit organization with the mission of serving the purpose of support, through lessening gaps of disparities, advocacy through mobilizing and improving health equity for Black gay men living with HIV. To date, THRIVE Support Services Inc is connected to over 3,300 Black men living with HIV, has linked over 2,000 people living with HIV to healthcare and support services and has the largest network of Black gay men living with HIV in the Southeastern United States.
2:45 pm - 3:00 pm
Break
3:00 pm - 4:30 pm
What it Means to be an HIV Funder: Maintaining Focus, Expanding Priorities
+More Info
3:00 pm - 4:30 pm
Ballroom
What it Means to be an HIV Funder: Maintaining Focus, Expanding Priorities

Finally, a panel of grantmakers will tackle what it means to be an HIV funder by digging more deeply into how their strategies have evolved over time to remain relevant to the current HIV response. In addition to telling their own stories, they will respond to a series of videotaped remarks from other philanthropic leaders that will play at the beginning of the session. The panel will seek to find the right balance between prioritization and integration of HIV and discuss how we ensure that the lessons learned that have fueled the success of the HIV response, become cornerstones of broader practice in human rights, social justice and health care.

 

Speakers

Lisa Bohmer
Lisa Bohmer leads implementation of the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation’s children affected by HIV and AIDS initiative. She is a public health professional with over 25 years of experience with programs, research and grant making in the areas of pediatric HIV/AIDS, maternal and child health, reproductive rights and the empowerment of women and girls. Prior to joining the Foundation, Bohmer served for five years as Director of Program Partnerships with the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation where she worked closely with private donors and NGO partners to support HIV testing and treatment services for women, children and families throughout Africa and India. Past positions include HIV/AIDS Director for UNICEF in Ethiopia where she initiated services with partners to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission. She has held other senior positions with Nike Foundation, the Pacific Institute for Women’s Health and Ipas. In addition, Bohmer has conducted collaborative research with the Center for the Study of Adolescence and the Kisumu Medical Education Trust in Kenya, and Makerere University’s Child Health and Development Center in Uganda. Bohmer has lived in Ethiopia and worked throughout Africa. She began her career working with foster youth and homeless women in Seattle. Bohmer has a Master’s in Public Health from the University of California at Los Angeles.  
Sergey Votyagov
Sergey Votyagov works as Director of the Robert Carr Fund, designing and implementing participatory grant making strategies to sustain and strengthen civil society and communities’ roles in the global HIV response. Sergey has close to 10 years of organizational leadership and management experience and over 10 years of experience in advocacy program design and management in politically challenging environments in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. Sergey engaged diverse national and international stakeholders in government, corporate, and nonprofit sectors to mobilize responses to public health challenges and has proven his ability to identify problems, formulate priorities and propose solutions. Prior to joining the Fund in 2016, Sergey played key roles in program piloting and organizational start-up, merger and expansion that were critical to the development of his strategic thinking and leadership skills. Sergey is a 2010 graduate of Johns Hopkins University (USA) with Master’s Degree in Public Policy and Certificate in International Development.
Crystal Crawford
Crystal D. Crawford is a program director at The California Wellness Foundation where she currently manages grantmaking related to diversity in the health professions; women of color at risk for, or living with, HIV, AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections; and employment for women who have been incarcerated. Her responsibilities include reviewing letters of interest, requesting and evaluating grant proposals, conducting site visits, making funding recommendations and monitoring active grants. Prior to joining Cal Wellness in August 2012, Crawford was CEO of the California Black Women’s Health Project (CABWHP), the only statewide organization solely devoted to improving the health of California’s black women and girls through policy, advocacy, education and outreach. Prior to her role as CEO, she was CABWHP’s director of public policy. Before working in the nonprofit, public interest sector, Crawford was a litigation associate with nationally renowned corporate law firms in Los Angeles, Boston and New York, as well as a public school teacher. Crawford is actively involved in the leadership of numerous civic and community organizations. She serves as vice chairperson of the Los Angeles County Public Health Commission and as a member of the Women’s Health Policy Council for the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health’s Office of Women’s Health. She served on the executive committee of the Women’s Health Council of the statewide Office of Women’s Health (OWH) until its elimination in July 2012. She serves on the board of the Rockefeller Center for Public Policy at Dartmouth, which provides students with public policy and leadership development, academic instruction, training opportunities and internships. She is also an officer of her church in Inglewood, where she directs the provision of $50,000 annually in college scholarships to youth and young adults in South Los Angeles. In 1997, she founded and continues to direct College Conquerors, her church’s undergraduate pipeline program that provides youth with college preparation and counseling services. She previously served on the boards of the Tucker Foundation at Dartmouth College, Health Access California and SisterSong and on the advisory council for the California Breast Cancer Research Program. Crawford is the recipient of numerous awards including the 2009 Advocates’ Award from the Western Center on Law and Poverty and the 2012 PowerPAC Award from the Los Angeles African American Women’s Political Action Committee. Originally from Harlem, New York, Crawford earned her bachelor’s degree in history from Dartmouth College and law degree from New York University School of Law. She is admitted to the bar in California, New York and New Jersey.
Stanley Wong
Stanley Wong is the senior grants manager for Asia, Middle East and Africa at the Levi Strauss Foundation—an independent, private foundation that conveys the pioneering spirit and enduring values of Levi Strauss & Co.: originality, empathy, integrity, and courage. The Foundation’s mission is to advance the human rights and well-being of underserved people in places where LS&Co. has a business presence. Stan oversees the portfolio of grants awarded to organizations in the region that are driving meaningful change in the areas of HIV/AIDS, social justice, and the rights and well-being of workers in the apparel sector. Prior to joining Levi Strauss in 2007, Stan worked for ten years at the amfAR, the Foundation for AIDS Research, where he helped extend HIV treatment to highly affected communities in the Asia Pacific region. Stan is originally from New York but currently based in Singapore.
Amelia Korangy
Amelia Korangy is a Senior Manager in External Affairs at ViiV Healthcare, where she leads the company’s community giving in the US and Positive Action Programs.  Prior to joining ViiV Healthcare, Amelia worked as a Senior Consultant at TCC Group, where she partnered with foundations, companies, and nonprofits to design and implement a range of philanthropic, capacity building and corporate citizenship programs.  At TCC Group, Amelia led multi-year capacity building initiatives and philanthropic portfolios in issue areas from the arts to youth homelessness alongside Target, the James Irvine Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and other family foundations. Prior to joining TCC Group, Korangy worked to design a national grantmaking strategy to end child sexual abuse as part of a partnered initiative between the Ms. Foundation for Women and the NoVo Foundation. She’s a trained social worker, and has provided direct services to LGBTQ, HIV+, and homeless young people with organizations including the Hetrick-Martin Institute and Young Ladies of Tomorrow.  Korangy began her career launching FAIR Girls, a nonprofit social enterprise that supports girls who have been trafficked and sexually exploited with economic empowerment and art therapy programs. Amelia graduated from the University of Maryland in College Park as a CIVICUS Associate with a bachelor’s degree in Government and Politics, and Rhetoric.  She received a Master’s degree in Social Enterprise from Columbia University’s School of Social Work, where she focused on strategic philanthropy.
4:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Closing Remarks with Ndaba Mandela
+More Info
4:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Ballroom
Closing Remarks with Ndaba Mandela

Ndaba Mandela, Chairman and Founder, Mandela Institute for Humanity, will close the 2019 AIDS Philanthropy Summit. Ndaba will respond to the closing plenary’s discussion of “What does it mean to be an HIV funder today,” and share how the Mandela family was one of the first families to openly talk about how a loved one passed away from AIDS, and why the world needs to band together to eradicate it

Speakers

Ndaba Mandela
Author/activist, Ndaba Thembekile Zweliyajika Mandela, is an outspoken influencer and change agent on the African continent and in the arena of international politics. He was born in South Africa in 1982 as his grandfather, Nelson Mandela, endured a third decade in prison on Robben Island. Ndaba spent his early childhood in the Transkei, Durban and Johannesburg, surrounded by a vibrant extended family that included legendary African National Congress activists. Witnessing both the shocking abuses of apartheid and the complex struggle to end it, Ndaba was exposed early to radical ideals of democracy and resistance beyond the tear gas and police raids on his neighborhood in Soweto. In 1989, Ndaba met his grandfather for the first time at Victor Verster Prison. A few months later, Nelson Mandela was a free man, and in 1993, shortly before he was elected the first black president of a democratic South Africa, Mandela brought Ndaba to live with him, relishing the opportunity to be there for his grandchild in a way he was not allowed to be there for his sons and daughters. Being raised by a legend had its challenges, but Ndaba navigated a tumultuous adolescence and majored in Political Science and International Relations at the University of Pretoria. He graduated in 2009 and began his career as a senior political consultant to the Embassy of Japan in South Africa and client liaison officer for an international asset management group. In 2013, upon Mandela's passing, it was his wish that Ndaba deliver the eulogy at his memorial. Today, Nelson Mandela’s legacy lives on through Ndaba, who continues to keep carry the message of Ubuntu forward - that all humanity is inherently connected. He recently founded the Mandela Institute for Humanity to lift up the next generation of African leaders and fight for the end of HIV/AIDS. Ndaba was the longest-serving ambassador for UN AIDS, the Co-Founder and former Chairman of Africa Rising, and the author of Going to the Mountain: Life Lessons from My Grandfather, Nelson Mandela. He is committed to dedicating his life to his country, his continent, and the young people around the world who stand for positive change.

Sponsors

Thank you to our amazing Summit Sponsors and Program Committee. We would not be able to plan and implement this event without their generous time and support.

You too can join this amazing list of organizations! Grantmakers now have the opportunity to sponsor different parts of the Summit that align with, or highlight, their grantmaking interests and impact. This is an excellent chance to demonstrate your commitment to the field of HIV and AIDS, as well as connect with an audience of leading private and pubic funders engaged in the HIV response.

Questions? Contact Sarah Hamilton sarah@fcaaids.org or download the 2019 Summit Sponsorship Guide

 

 

×