We have spent the past year taking an in-depth look at funding for community-based responses to the epidemic. One question we have asked ourselves as part of this process is: how are we defining “community?” Are we defining it as:

  • Individuals within a specific geography or people living in the same country or village?
  • Or a specific demographic, identity or common experience related to, for instance, age, gender, sexual identity, or HIV status?

The answer is all of the above. Communities are complex. Therefore, our approach to funding effective community-based responses must be as well. That is why we look forward to meeting with all of you in November. Together, we will identify new tools and opportunities to increase investment in the community-based approaches that are so critical to the fight against HIV/AIDS. At this year’s convening, we will:

  • Engage in strategic conversations on what’s happening among impacted communities
  • Build skills and discuss best practices to effectively support the hard to reach and excluded communities
  • Share the results of our research on funding for community-based responses.

Downloads:

 

Registration is now closed.

Schedule

Monday
November 5
10:00 am - 11:00 am
Registration and Coffee
11:00 am - 11:30 am
Academy Hall
Welcome
11:30 am - 1:00 pm
Academy Hall
Plenary #1: U.S. Policies Undermining the Human Rights and Autonomy of Activists
Session Designer: Open Society Foundations and American Jewish World Service, in partnership with the Global Philanthropy Project
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11:30 am - 1:00 pm
Academy Hall
Plenary #1: U.S. Policies Undermining the Human Rights and Autonomy of Activists

Session Designer: Open Society Foundations and American Jewish World Service, in partnership with the Global Philanthropy Project


Bilateral funding and policies have long been used as tools for donors to advance their ideological agendas in ways that undermine the autonomy of groups and locally-driven efforts to address human rights concerns. Using the Trump administration’s reinstatement and unprecedented expansion of the Global Gag Rule, as well as other donors’ counter policies to address it, this panel will illustrate the ways that donor conditionalities on funding are further disempowering local organizations and harming locally-driven advocacy, human rights, and the HIV response. Under the Global Gag Rule, organizations are forced to make the impossible choice between staying true to their mission to provide comprehensive sexual and reproductive healthcare, education, and advocacy – though in many cases at extremely reduced capacity – and accepting the U.S. funds which will allow them to continue to provide HIV and other health services, but will eliminate their ability to conduct any abortion related service delivery or advocacy. As a result, organizations may self-censor, choose sides, and sever partnerships, which leads to the further siloing of organizations and movements, and in many cases, completely stalls progress on local advocacy efforts to protect, respect, and fulfill the rights of all people. This session, designed by Open Society Foundations and American Jewish World Service in partnership with the Global Philanthropy Project, will contextualize the current threats to HIV, health, and human rights posed by the Global Gag Rule and related conservative religious actors. It will also explore ways that funders can support a shift in power toward grassroots human rights movements and community-led approaches to health and human rights to drive change in their countries. The session will also provide an opportunity for funders to strategize together about ways to support advocacy to mitigate the harms of ideologically-driven conditionality.

Speakers

Heather Benjamin
Heather Benjamin is a Program Officer for the Open Society Public Health Program, where she focuses on global health and human rights financing and harmful influences on health-related policy making. Her work exposes and challenges the ways donor ideologies are harming sexual health and reproductive rights and rights-based health responses for marginalized and criminalized communities. She currently serves on the international steering committee of the Red Umbrella Fund, which supports sex worker rights globally, and she previously served as a member of the board constituency of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria. Prior to joining Open Society, Benjamin served as the program director for Close to Home, a grassroots organization dedicated to preventing and reducing the impact of gender-based violence through community mobilization and youth leadership development. As a consultant, she has provided technical assistance and training to national and international NGOs on implementing community-led approaches to intersectional social change work, youth leadership development, and grant-making and advocacy strategy development. Benjamin has also worked in direct service as a gender-based violence counselor in shelter settings. A social worker by training, Benjamin holds an MA in social policy from Columbia University School of Social Work.
Javid Syed
Javid Syed is the Director of AJWS’s Sexual Health and Rights department. He came to AJWS with a decade of experience in helping communities develop their capacity to pursue social justice. Most recently, Javid worked as the TB/HIV project director at the Treatment Action Group (TAG). On a volunteer basis, Javid contributes his skills to community organizing efforts among lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people of color. He helped found the Audre Lorde Project, a center for community organizing for queer people of color in New York, and served as a leader both the South Asian Lesbian and Gay Association of New York and the Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice. Javid has a master’s degree in public health from Columbia University. He is originally from Bombay, India, and has lived in the United States since 1989.
Cinthya Amanecer Velasco Botello
Cinthya Amanecer Velasco Botello a lesbian feminist, is the Executive Director of the Collective for Women and Health (Colectiva Mujeres y Salud), a leading feminist organization in the Dominican Republic that promotes ideological, social, and cultural change by fighting to improve the visibility of and strengthen access to sexual and reproductive health. She has 20 years of experience in sexual and reproductive rights and is a leading spokesperson on these issues in Dominican print, broadcast, and radio outlets. She has spent the last decade advocating for the decriminalization of abortion in Latin America and the Caribbean, youth rights, sexual comprehensive education, and LBTQ rights. She has also led a number of social change initiatives, including the Latin American and Caribbean Sexual and Reproductive Rights Youth Network and The Right Here Right Now platform. Originally from Mexico City, Velasco graduated from the National School for Anthropology and History with a degree in Anthropology and Gender and Politics in 2010.
José Manuel Morán Faúndes
José Manuel Morán Faúndes is the co-author of the Growing Solidarity Report commissioned by the Global Philanthropy Project and Professor of the Sociology of Law and researcher in the Program of Sexual and Reproductive Rights at the National University of Cordoba in Argentina. Previously, he was a researcher for the Gender Equity Program and Governance Program at FLACSO-Chile, and fellow of CLACSO, CONICET, the Iberoamerican Network for Lay Freedom, among others. Currently, he is the co-editor of "Sexualities, Inequalities and Rights: Reflections on Sexual and Reproductive Rights", "Sex, Crimes and Sins: Intersections between religion, sexuality and law in Latin America", and "Laicidad and Religious Diversity in Latin America". He holds a PhD in Latin American Social Studies and a Master of Sociology from the National University of Cordoba
Jedidah Maina
Jedidah Mainais the Executive Director of Trust for Indigenous Culture and Health (TICAH) a Kenya-based non-profit trust working to enhance the positive links between culture and health.  Her work includes training and research in comprehensive HIV care, publication and documentation to stimulate attention to grassroots solutions, and activist advocacy to raise voices in effective ways that affect policy and programs. Jedidah has over ten years of experience as an activist, program manager, and organizer concerning sexual and reproductive health and rights. Her work has included designing fun and educational materials and advocate for change in attitudes, policies, programs and power relationships. During this period of her work she has contributed to the “Using Our Traditions” and “Healthy Households” programs that support HIV+ people manage their illness, protect their health and receive the care they need. This program aims to provide practical information about traditional medicines and foods and herbal remedies that can be used to treat illnesses in children and adults in resource constrained areas, to improve patient literacy and awareness of local health issues and local health assets to provide local solutions to local challenges. Jedidah holds an MA in Project Planning and Management and a BA in Economics and Sociology from the University of Nairobi.
Santos A. Simione
Santos Simione is the Executive Director of AMODEFA – Mozambican Association for Family Development - the oldest Mozambican organization on Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) and has been working in designing and managing SRHR and community-based HIV/AIDS prevention, care, treatment, and supporting programs for more than 10 years. He is a sexual and reproductive rights activist, and expert on developing programs and services which respond to key populations’ rights and needs, and which support awareness creation and advocacy. Simione has a successful track record in strengthening civil society organizations and activists in support of SRHR, KP, and PLHIV through his experience as a trainer on gender equality, gender identity, sexual rights, HIV and AIDS, CSE and KP-friendly service provision amongst others.
Brian Honermann
Brian Honermann is Deputy Director of Public Policy at amfAR, the Foundation for AIDS Research. His work primarily focuses on data transparency, human rights, access to medicines, and - more recently - the impact of the Expanded Mexico City Policy on the global HIV response. Previously, he worked for the AIDS Law Project and SECTION27 in Johannesburg, South Africa helping bring anti-discrimination and access to health care cases for people living with HIV. Brian also worked for the O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law at Georgetown University conducting program evaluations on pediatric HIV programs.
1:00 pm - 2:15 pm
Academy Hall
Lunch and hosted discussions
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1:00 pm - 2:15 pm
Academy Hall
Lunch and hosted discussions

This lunch will feature up to 12 hosted discussions relevant to topics at this year’s Summit. Each table host will lead participants in a focused conversation on their specific topic, with the goal to also answer how Funders Concerned About AIDS can play a role in facilitating future programming or collaborations on it.  FCAA will be reaching out soon to survey you on your top lunch table discussion topics.

 

2:30 pm - 3:45 pm
Academy Hall
International: Community Advocacy Works but Where is the Funding?
Session Designer: Aidsfonds
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2:30 pm - 3:45 pm
Academy Hall
International: Community Advocacy Works but Where is the Funding?

This session showcases milestone stories of community advocacy and why it works. Although communities have been put high on the agenda of donors, service delivery programs too often see them as recipients and not as vehicles for social change. Furthermore, there is a gap in funding community advocacy despite the increased mobilization of key populations globally. Lack of rights-based approaches by donors and governments aggravates this gap.

In the framework of PITCH program, Partnership to Inspire, Transform and Connect the HIV response, Aidsfonds and the International HIV/AIDS Alliance would like to share the success story of Mozambique, Uganda and Kenya by inviting the very vital actors of an efficient national HIV responses. This session will explore the importance of funding sustainable community advocacy strategies by sharing concrete examples of why it works and why it’s necessary. It will explain how funders and civil society organizations can develop the capacities of community-based organizations of key populations, as well as collaborate with and provide support to community-based groups in their advocacy with their governments. To illustrate the importance of community advocacy, we will highlight the collaboration between the national police of Mozambique with key populations in Mozambique. We will share the success of cross key populations partnership in Kenya and the engagement of sex workers in the response to HIV in Uganda.

Objectives:

  • To increase awareness of the gap in funding for community advocacy.
  • To share best practices in funding community advocacy and highlight why it works.
  • To showcase the need for integrated national HIV responses, with multiple stakeholders and communities in the driving seat of the advocacy strategy.

Key questions:

  • How can funders and other stakeholders best support the development of a sustainable and robust community response to HIV and Human Rights?
  • Which are the ingredients of success for community advocacy and how KP activists made their claims heard by their governments?
  • How can funders foster the development of rights-based responses to HIV and why test and treat programmes are insufficient in tackling the HIV epidemics?

Speakers

Dennis van Wanrooij
Dennis van Wanrooij has over nine years of work experience in the fields of sexuality, gender and rights, and is a sex workers’ rights, HIV and LGBTQ+ activist originally from Sao Paulo, Brazil but currently living in The Netherlands. At the moment Dennis works as Senior Policy Advisor at the Sex Work department at Aidsfonds and is the lead of the PITCH programme. He’s also involved in other large HIV programmes such as Bridging the Gaps and works closely with sex workers in Kyrgyzstan, Mozambique, Nigeria, and Ukraine. Previously, he has worked for the Red Umbrella Fund, the European Network for the Promotion of Rights and Health among Migrant Sex Workers (TAMPEP), and the United Nations Latin American Institute for the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Offenders (ILANUD). He has also conducted consultancies for the Global Network of Sex Work Projects (NSWP), International Committee on the Rights of Sex Workers in Europe (ICRSE), and HIV Young Leaders Fund (HYLF). Dennis holds an LLM in International and European Public Law at Tilburg University (Netherlands) and a BA in Law at the Catholic University of Sao Paulo.
Flavia Kyomukama
Flavia Kyomukama is an educationist by profession and an HIV and gender activist. Flavia is currently the Programme Manager Women Organisations Network for Human Rights Advocacy (WONETHA) for five years and PITCH Project Coordinator at WONETHA. Flavia has been instrumental in enhancing the capacity of female sex workers capacity to implement long-term and sustainable grants focused directly on the needs of the female sex workers in Uganda. Flavia has also supported various Key populations communities from inception and continues to support their capacity building programming and resource mobilisations strategies to ensure sustainable organisations. Flavia is the founder of the National Forum for People living with HIV Networks in Uganda.  She is an excellent advocate for the rights of marginalized communities and key populations specifically, and her passion for community empowerment, inclusion, access to services and livelihood support /community safety nets is invaluable. She is also currently a member of the Global Network of PLHIV (GNP+). Flavia previously worked in Mozambique in as Provincial Coordinator UNESCO project for United National for International Partnership. At the end of the project, she served with Mozambique network of AIDS service organizations (MONASO) as Adviser Advocacy for Access to Antiretroviral Treatment.
Grace Mukuhi Kamau
Grace Mukuhi Kamau currently works as the National Coordinator of the Kenya Key Population Consortium. Grace holds a Bachelor degree in Sociology and Political science from the Catholic University of Eastern Africa. She identifies as a woman sex worker. She has worked in the HIV field in relation to key population for 8 years now. She has previously worked at Bar Hostess Empowerment Programme (BHESP) as Program Officer. She later joined KESWA a consultant to offer support on organizational development. She has also worked as a consultant with the Global Network of Sex work Projects. Her passion has been working key populations on issues of HIV prevention, human rights and movement building
Maria Justina Eduardo Cumbe
Justina Cumbe is a Senior Superintendent in the Mozambique National Police. She is currently the Chief of Research and Planning Department and coordinator of Police strategic planning. She helps coordinate the creation of the Violence against Women and Children Unit in 2004. She is also the Coordinator of Gender Unity for implementation of SADC Protocol of Gender and Development within Ministry of Interior and National Champion of SARPCCO-SADC Police Women Networking. Justina also teaches at the Mozambique Police academy on courses in Human Rights and Criminology and is a facilitator for the Modules of Women Empowerment in training course of Command and Leadership for emerging women Police Officers and Project Management for Seniors Women Police Officers. She also has expertise in human resources management specifically gender and affirmative action.
2:30 pm - 3:45 pm
Vista Room
Domestic U.S.: HIV Health Care Access: Impact of the Administration’s Efforts to Undermine Key ACA & Medicaid Protections - “A Marriage of Grassroots and Grasstops Advocacy to Protect the ACA and Medicaid”
Session Designer: AIDS Foundation of Chicago
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2:30 pm - 3:45 pm
Vista Room
Domestic U.S.: HIV Health Care Access: Impact of the Administration’s Efforts to Undermine Key ACA & Medicaid Protections - “A Marriage of Grassroots and Grasstops Advocacy to Protect the ACA and Medicaid”

This workshop will provide an overview of recent Trump Administration and Congressional efforts to undermine the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and restrict access to Medicaid coverage. It will describe how these efforts (including proposed work requirements, drug screening and prescription drug access restrictions) threaten meaningful access to health care for people living with HIV and other low-income and vulnerable populations.  The panelists will discuss community-based strategies for responding to initiatives that have the potential to undermine gains made in expanding access to health care coverage for people with HIV – particularly in Medicaid expansion states.  They will also provide recommendations for proactive health reforms at the state level to mitigate harm and that could improve upon current HIV health care systems.  Join us and learn how to participate in efforts to stop this Administration and Congress from threatening the health of people living with HIV!

Speakers

Ramon Gardenhire
Ramon Gardenhire is the vice president of Policy for the AIDS Foundation of Chicago (AFC) and oversees AFC's advocacy and policy work at the federal, state and local level. His areas of focus include the implementation of the Affordable Care Act and ensuring that new federal and state health care systems meet the needs of people living with and affected by HIV, Medicaid policy, state budget and appropriations, health care and HIV-related legislation and policy, and the Illinois AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP). At the state level, Gardenhire is proudest of his efforts in leading a coalition that successfully expanded Medicaid coverage for low-income adults without children under the Affordable Care Act. The expansion makes approximately half a million Illinoisans newly eligible for health care coverage.
Andrea Weddle
Andrea Weddle has been the executive director of the HIV Medicine Association (HIVMA), an organization representing frontline HIV medical providers and researchers, since September 2008. Previously, she served as the associate director of the association for 6 years. She devotes much of her time to advancing HIVMA’s public policy and advocacy priorities, which include improving access to health care for people with HIV/AIDS; addressing HIV medical workforce issues and promoting public policies grounded in science. Prior to joining HIVMA, she conducted policy research on Medicaid managed care programs as a research associate for the Center for HIV Quality Care and served as the staff director for the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. Ms. Weddle has worked in the health policy field for more than 10 years and has a Master’s in Social Welfare from the University of California, Berkeley.
Robert Greenwald
Robert Greenwald is a Clinical Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and the Faculty Director of the Law School’s Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation. In addition to teaching seminars in health and public health law and policy, for over 25 years Robert has been engaged in state and national research, policy development and advocacy to expand access to high-quality healthcare, reduce health disparities, and promote more equitable and effective healthcare systems. Robert serves as co-chair of the Chronic Illness & Disability Partnership and the HIV Health Care Access Working Group. From 2000-2006 Robert served as a member of the President’s Advisory Council on AIDS and as co-chair of its Access to Care Sub-committee. Robert has also served as a consultant to the Health Resources Services Administration and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Community Advisory Board.
Jaron Benjamin
Jaron Benjamin is the vice president for community mobilization for Housing Works, Inc, and is involved in Birddog Nation, a nation-wide effort that stopped the repeal of the Affordable Care Act in 2017. He also coordinates the “Act Now, End AIDS” coalition, a nationwide partnership dedicated to organizing and assisting states, cities, and counties in committing to ending the epidemic. Before joining Housing Works, Jaron was executive director at the Met Council on Housing, the oldest tenant organization in the US., and before that, the coordinator for VOCAL-NY’s AIDS Housing Network.
3:45 pm - 4:00 pm
Break
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Academy Hall
Plenary: Last Mile Funding: Improving Philanthropic Funding of Community Action on AIDS
Session Designers: FCAA, Firelight Foundation, Avert
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4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Academy Hall
Plenary: Last Mile Funding: Improving Philanthropic Funding of Community Action on AIDS

Communities are at the heart of the global HIV and AIDS response. Many of the key innovations, breakthroughs and progress on the ground would not have happened without the involvement of communities. Nearly forty years into the pandemic, community responses are still leading the way, helping to ensure that available resources are used most effectively and that the most affected groups are not left behind.In the first of our two-part plenary series, we will discuss three resources that funders can use when funding community-based organizations. FCAA will also publicly launch a new research paper that explores some of these best practices and challenges, as well as a as well as a data analysis which provides a new baseline to track HIV-related philanthropy for civil society organizations.  Finally, we will be joined by a grantmaker and their community partner who have produced a report reflecting on how to improve support for community-driven change.   This will be an interactive session, so come prepared to think about and answer questions such as “how do you define community?” and “how can private philanthropy support community action?”

Speakers

Kate Harrison
Kate Harrison is head of programme funding at Avert. Kate has over 20 years’ experience in health, HIV and international development, including work in Uganda, Kenya, Ghana, Zimbabwe, Tanzania, India and Cambodia. Kate has several years’ experience in funding international health and HIV, with particular expertise in community-based approaches to support maternal and child health, including HIV and sexual and reproductive health. Prior to Avert, Kate led the Children’s Investment Fund Foundation’s HIV work, including managing partnerships with the Presidents Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) and the Global Fund for AIDS, TB and Malaria (GFATM). Before joining CIFF in June 2015, Kate was a Senior Manager in the International Grants Team at Comic Relief for seven years, with oversight for Health and HIV. She led the development of Comic Relief’s first health strategy, and a revision to the HIV strategy to include a greater focus on the leadership of people living with HIV. Kate was Senior Technical Advisor for Children at the International HIV/AIDS Alliance for seven years. She led the development of guidance on community-based approaches to support children affected by HIV and AIDS, including the interactive online resource www.ovcsupport.net, a set of guidance notes for community workers called ‘Building Blocks’ which was adapted and translated into six languages, and a book published by Macmillan publishers: ‘Building Hope’. She is a co-founder of the Coalition for Children Affected by AIDS www.ccaba.org, a member of the Private Foundations Constituency of the Global Fund for AIDS, TB and Malaria, and was on the Steering Committee for the Global Plan for Elimination of Mother to Child Transmission. Kate serves on the FCAA Board of Directors
Matt Greenall
Matt Greenall is an independent consultant specializing in community health programming with an emphasis on highly affected and marginalised populations in low income countries and particular experience in AIDS and malaria programmes.  He has nearly 20 years of experience helping community groups, NGOs, governments and funding organisations to plan, review and improve efforts to improve the health and protect the rights of marginalized and highly affected groups. With Masters degrees in human rights and in public health Matt is comfortable with applying diverse frames of reference and methods and takes a multidisciplinary approach to analysing change and the factors behind it.  He is also a strong proponent of participatory approaches and ownership not just in community work but also in work with funding agencies and policy makers.  His programming level work has mostly been in northern and sub-saharan Africa.
Cat Gironda
Caterina (Cat) Gironda joined FCAA in 2016 as the Research & Communications Associate. As part of a small team, she supports her colleagues on programming and communications for the organization, while her main role is to manage FCAA’s resource tracking project, wherein she collects and codes grants for their annual report, tracking the landscape of philanthropic support to address HIV/AIDS. Cat currently serves as a Steering Committee member for the DC chapter of Emerging Practitioners in Philanthropy (EPIP). In a previous life, Cat worked in higher education at North Carolina State University in Gender & Sexuality studies, where her research focused on feminism and activism in online spaces and her teaching highlighted gender and racial inequities in STEM fields. Her prior work in the nonprofit field includes stretches at Girl Rising and the Third Wave Fund, as well as early work in HIV/STI prevention education. Cat received her master’s degree in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies from the CUNY Graduate Center, as well as a bachelor’s degree in Women’s Studies from Brooklyn College.  
Sadaf Shallwani
Sadaf Shallwani, PhD, serves as Director of Learning and Evaluation at Firelight Foundation. Prior to joining Firelight, Sadaf worked for many years leading research and evaluation with different agencies of the Aga Khan Development Network in East Africa, South Asia, and Central Asia. She has also led a number of child development and education programs and research projects in Canada. Sadaf completed her PhD in Developmental Psychology and Education (focusing on early childhood development) from the University of Toronto / Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. Her dissertation research examined how school and classroom environments affect children's adjustment and learning at early primary levels in Pakistan. Sadaf also holds a Masters degree in Social Work, with a focus on community practice and research, and a Bachelor's degree in Psychology, with a focus on child development. Sadaf’s interests and expertise lie at the intersections of early childhood development and wellbeing, contextually-grounded and socially-conscious research and evaluation, and community-driven learning and action.
Moses Zulu
Moses Zulu is the co-founder and Chief Executive Officer of Luapula Foundation in Zambia. Moses has over two decades of experience working with marginalized individuals and communities in social and public health. He holds a PhD in Sociology and a Master’s Degree in Public Health from University of the Western Cape, South Africa; as well as an International Certificate in International Advisory from the Management Development Foundation in the Netherlands. Moses co-founded Luapula Foundation in 2001 to empower communities to care for their children at the height of the HIV and AIDS crisis. Since then, Luapula Foundation has designed and implement numerous community-based initiatives addressing issues associated with HIV and AIDS, and social development more broadly. Luapula Foundation also builds the capacity of other local grassroots organizations to strengthen their stability and functions, and better respond to community needs.
5:30 pm - 7:00 pm
Reception
Tuesday
November 6
9:00 am - 9:15 am
Academy Hall
Opening Remarks
9:15 am - 11:00 am
Academy Hall
Plenary: Catalyzing Communities: Improving Philanthropic Funding of Community Action on AIDS
Session Designers: FCAA, Red Umbrella Fund, UHAI: EASHRI, International HIV/AIDS Alliance, AIDS United
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9:15 am - 11:00 am
Academy Hall
Plenary: Catalyzing Communities: Improving Philanthropic Funding of Community Action on AIDS

In the second half of our two-part plenary, we will dive into what it means to effectively fund community. What are the best practices leading the way – from participatory grantmaking, urgent action funds, and collaborative funding efforts – and how does it impact community-led action on the ground? We will also explore what we can do differently to become more effective in funding community.

Speakers

Jen Bokoff
Jen Bokoff is the director of stakeholder engagement at Foundation Center. She develops partnerships and projects that build knowledge and strategy for grantmakers. She likes asking "so what?" to push Foundation Center's data-driven work to be as valuable and actionable as it can be to social sector changemakers. She also runs GrantCraft, a free service that taps the practical wisdom of funders to improve the collective knowledge of the philanthropy field. In her role, Jen regularly speaks at conferences and facilitates workshops with funders, and connects people to resources, ideas, and one another. A graduate of Tufts University, Jen studied community health and sociology and spent two years involved in the Learning by Giving philanthropy program. She serves on the Alumni Council's executive committee and also serves on an advisory committee for The Moth’s education programs. In her spare time, she is an amateur comedic improviser, avid Brooklyn nerd, and second base woman on Foundation Center's winning-in-spirit softball team. Jen is a firm believer that social innovation and change happen only when passionate people across different industries collaborate; being a strong connector enables this growth in local communities and throughout the world.
Mutisya Leonard
Mutisya Leonard is a Kenyan queer man and social justice activist. Over the last 4 years, he has served as Support Officer to the Executive Director of UHAI EASHRI. In his role, he manages UHAI’s communication assets, and provides key administrative and strategic support to institutional fundraising, reporting, philanthropic partnerships and philanthropic advocacy. He came to UHAI following a 7-year background in sexual health service delivery; legal and policy engagement and advocacy; and fundraising for civil society at LVCT Health, (Kenya’s)National Gay and Lesbian Human Rights CommissionNyanza Reproductive Health Society, and Gay Kenya, working with gay and bisexual men and sex workers in urban and rural Kenya, and particularly on access to HIV treatment, fighting prejudice based on sexual and gender diversity, and challenging the criminalisations of HIV and homosexuality. Mutisya is passionate about writing and advocacy on participatory funding for self-determining movements for health and human rights.
Nadia van der Linde
Nadia van der Linde joined the Red Umbrella Fund as the first Coordinator in 2012. She organised the first Asia Pacific Regional Consultation on HIV and Sex Work in 2010 in partnership with different UN agencies, governments, and the Asia Pacific Network of Sex Workers (APNSW). She did some projects for the APNSW afterwards. Nadia holds a Masters in Social Geography from the University in Amsterdam. She has years of experience particularly in the field of sexual and reproductive rights, advocacy, and youth participation processes with Choice, the Youth Coalition, Women’s Global Network for Reproductive Rights (WGNRR), the People’s Health Movement, Stichting Alexander and UNFPA. She is currently also on the board of  the Prostitution Information Center (PIC) in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Nadia speaks Dutch, English and Spanish.
Melanie Powers
Melanie Powers joined AIDS United in July 2017 and serves as a Program Manager for the Southern HIV Impact Fund. Prior to moving to her current base in Atlanta, GA, she worked for 8 years in HIV prevention, reproductive justice, and comprehensive sex education instruction and advocacy in her hometown of New Orleans, LA. She received her Master of Public Health in 2014 and is thrilled to be able to marry her public health experience with her passion for advancing social justice. When she’s not working, you will most likely find Melanie laughing and adventuring with her partner, Eve, and pup, Wookie.
Karen Johnson
Karen Johnson is the Lead: Trusts and Foundations at the International HIV/AIDS Alliance. Karen joined the Alliance as Global Campaign Manager in 2014 and led the Alliance’s Paradise or Persecution campaign for the decriminalisation of LGBT people. She now leads the organisation’s efforts to build and maintain relationships with Trusts and Foundations to advance the strategic objectives of the Alliance. Previously, Karen spent over 11 years at Amnesty International’s Secretariat in London and led the global campaign on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, most specifically for universal ratification of the Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on ESC Rights.
P.J. Moton-Poole
P.J. comes to us with ten years in the field of HIV/AIDS research, prevention, and care, specifically focusing on communities in the South. Born in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, he is a 2013 graduate of Washington University’s George Warren Brown School of Social Work in St. Louis, Missouri where he earned his Master of Social Work degree with a concentration in Children, Youth, and Families. P.J. is also a 2011 graduate of Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee where he earned Bachelor of Arts degrees in Psychology and Sociology. During his undergraduate studies, PJ discovered a strong passion for the work conducted by non-profit organizations and from there he dedicated all of his time and efforts to serving underrepresented populations. While volunteerism has always been an important part of his life, he was really able to exercise this passion throughout his collegiate studies. PJ is inspired by the unapologetic rise of communities of color, who, in his opinion, are recognizing their power in ways that will change the world.  In his spare time, PJ enjoys music, movies, and travel.
Devanand Milton (Millie)
Devanand Milton is a Transgender woman who is actively involved in the planning, implementation and oversight of HIV and AIDS in Guyana. She is the President and a Peer Educator for Guyana Trans United, the only trans-led organization in Guyana and one of the few active organizations in the English-speaking Caribbean. Millie is an NGO Delegation Member on UNAIDS PCB representing Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) and is also the Vice Chair and Transgender representative on the Country Coordinating Mechanism (CCM) for the Global Fund in Guyana. This current portfolio also entails networking with both National and International Stakeholders so as to advance the cause and needs of Transgender individuals and members of the Key Population. Millie focuses on, among other things, HIV/STI prevention, behaviour change interventions, HIV counselling and testing, adherence counselling and community outreach to promote a healthy lifestyle. She also works as an HIV case navigator and provides psychosocial support to peers.
Daisy Nakato Namakula
Daisy Nakato Namakula is a passionate Sex Worker’s and other key population’s human rights activist.  She is a founding member and former Executive Director of Women’s organization network for human rights advocacy (WONETHA) a sex work led organization that has been in existence for ten years. She is currently the National Coordinator for the Uganda network of sex worker’s organizations where she coordinates all sex work led organizations. She is the Chairperson of key and priority population (KP/PP) sub community advisory board (CAB) at Baylor-Uganda CRS. Chairperson of the board of directors at Transgender Equality Uganda and Oganisation for gender empowerment and rights advocacy (OGERA) and a member of the African key population expert group (AKPEG). Daisy is a solution driven manager, coordinator, networker, mobiliser, communicator, assistance provider and mediator, Daisy envisions a well-coordinated and harmonized voice of sex workers and a Uganda where sex work is decriminalized and accepted as work.
11:00 am - 11:15 am
Break
11:15 am - 12:15 pm
Academy Hall
International: The Win-Win: Why HIV Programs For Children Should Aim To Improve Both HIV Outcomes and Health and Development More Broadly

Session Designer: The Coalition for Children affected by AIDS, mothers2mothers and the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation
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11:15 am - 12:15 pm
Academy Hall
International: The Win-Win: Why HIV Programs For Children Should Aim To Improve Both HIV Outcomes and Health and Development More Broadly


It has long been recognized that ending AIDS in children will require more than just a biomedical approach.  Indeed, many of the challenges to achieving the 90-90-90 HIV target are inherently social and economic and grounded in community-led development processes.  However, we are all still learning how to operationalize an integrated community-led approach effectively and at scale.  This approach requires new ways for working for all of us; not least a greater emphasis on partnerships outside of the HIV sector, community-clinic collaboration, and systems strengthening.   Private HIV donors have a vital role in this regard.  They have the flexibility to pioneer integrated approaches that meet the holistic needs of children affected by HIV/AIDS from which others can learn.  Several members of Funders Concerned About AIDS as well as several innovative implementors have tried and tested what works, particularly around the integration of early childhood development and social protection into HIV programming. This session brings together a panel of thought-leaders with research, implementation, and donor expertise in this field to explore the intersections between HIV and broader child health and development and the bi-directional benefits and opportunities for more integrated programming at the community level for those affected by HIV, including key populations.  It will identify what it takes to deliver a more holistic package of services and help donors analyze what they can do differently.

Speakers

Lisa Bohmer
Lisa Bohmer leads implementation of the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation’s children affected by HIV and AIDS initiative. She is a public health professional with over 25 years of experience with programs, research and grant making in the areas of pediatric HIV/AIDS, maternal and child health, reproductive rights and the empowerment of women and girls. Prior to joining the Foundation, Bohmer served for five years as Director of Program Partnerships with the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation where she worked closely with private donors and NGO partners to support HIV testing and treatment services for women, children and families throughout Africa and India. Past positions include HIV/AIDS Director for UNICEF in Ethiopia where she initiated services with partners to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission. She has held other senior positions with Nike Foundation, the Pacific Institute for Women’s Health and Ipas. In addition, Bohmer has conducted collaborative research with the Center for the Study of Adolescence and the Kisumu Medical Education Trust in Kenya, and Makerere University’s Child Health and Development Center in Uganda. Bohmer has lived in Ethiopia and worked throughout Africa. She began her career working with foster youth and homeless women in Seattle. Bohmer has a Master’s in Public Health from the University of California at Los Angeles.  
Maureen Black
Maureen Black, Ph.D. is a pediatric psychologist who conducts research in strategies to promote healthy nutrition and child development and to prevent health disparities. At the University of Maryland, she is the founder and director of the Growth and Nutrition Clinic, and holds a primary appointment in the Department of Pediatrics and secondary appointments in the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health and Department of Medicine.  Dr. Black has adjunct appointments in the Department of International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and in the Department of Psychology at the University of Maryland Baltimore County.
Frank Beadle de Palomo
Frank Beadle de Palomo has over 26 years experience in the global health community that includes significant achievements in HIV prevention, domestic and global care, research, and advocacy. Before joining mothers2mothers (m2m) as CEO in 2012, Frank was Senior Vice President and Director of the Global Health, Population, and Nutrition Group at FHI 360. Previously, Frank was Senior Vice President and Director of the Academy for Educational Development (AED), where he re-established the organisation as a leader in global AIDS programmes. He also created and directed the National Council of La Raza ‘s Center for Health Promotion in the U.S.
Gretchen Bachman
Gretchen Bachman is the Team Leader and Senior Advisor for Orphans and Vulnerable Children at the Office of HIV/AIDS at the United States Agency for International Development, based in Washington DC. Gretchen has worked in the field of international development since 1993 throughout Asia, Africa and the Caribbean, focusing on projects to improve the health and socio-economic well-being of women and children. She is a co-chair for the PEPFAR Orphans and Vulnerable Children Technical Working Group, a Leadership committee member of Together for Girls and both a founding and steering committee member of the Better Care Network
Dominic Kemps
Dominic Kemps is the Director of the Positive Action for Children Fund (PACF), a private fund established by ViiV Healthcare which currently supports over 150 community interventions across 30 countries addressing mother to child transmission of HIV. As of July 2013, PACF partners had reached over 1.2 million people through outreach activities, driving over 168,000 into the health system, with nearly 120,000 specifically for HIV testing and over 11,000 testing positive. In addition to grants, the PACF seeks to support the development of community networks in support of eMTCT and aims to contribute to the evidence base on the importance and value of community interventions
Louise van Deth
Louise van Deth is Executive director of Aidsfonds. Before that she was director of Stichting Natuur en Milieu for five years and assistant director of the Centraal Bureau Fondsenwerving for seven years. She started her career as an investment banker with Pierson, Heldring & Pierson. After that she made a deliberate switch to the NGO sector. She has served on the board of a variety of charitable organisations. During the past 15 years she has acted as treasurer of Mama Cash, and until 2008, was chair of the climate project HIER, a coalition of 40 beneficiaries of the Dutch Postcode Lottery. Louise received an MBA from Tuck School of Business and a Master’s in English language and literature from the University of Amsterdam.
Clara Banya
Clara Banya is an Ambassador for The Coalition for Children Affected by AIDS.  She is a mother of two children, one of whom is HIV positive. She also has a husband living with HIV. She is a dynamic and experienced speaker about the problems and solutions to tackling stigma, improving access and adherence as well as how to support caregivers so that their children can survive and thrive HIV. She is part of the Global Fund Advocates Network and the Director of the Malawi Chapter of the International Community of Women Living with HIV.
11:15 am - 12:15 pm
Vista Room
Domestic U.S.: Tools for Diversity and Equity: Hiring and Retaining Trans Women of Color
Session Designer: Grantmakers United for Trans Communities program (GUTC), an initiative of Funders for LGBTQ Issues
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11:15 am - 12:15 pm
Vista Room
Domestic U.S.: Tools for Diversity and Equity: Hiring and Retaining Trans Women of Color

While HIV/AIDS funders have often taken the lead in supporting transgender communities’ response to the epidemic, trans women of color remain relatively few and far between among our professional colleagues in the philanthropic sector. Why is that the case, even when trans women of color are disproportionally affected by HIV and AIDS? How is our grantmaking negatively impacted without their voices alongside ours as staff members at foundations? What can be done about it? Attendees at this highly-interactive session will examine and interrogate the real-life challenges that largely exclude trans women of color from employment and advancement in institutional philanthropy and build upon our shared wisdom to locate the strategies and resources needed to overcome these obstacles. Join us and other attendees to increase your own awareness of what a philanthropic sector that better includes and supports trans women of color as foundation staff could look like and come away with new ideas and tools to try out at your own workplace.

Speakers

Alexander Lee
Alexander Lee is the Project Director for Funders for LGBTQ Issues’ Grantmakers United for Trans Communities program (GUTC). An attorney, community organizer and filmmaker, Alex is the founding Executive Director of the Transgender, Gender Variant, and Intersex Justice Project (TGIJP), a community-based legal services and policy organization based in San Francisco that works to end the abuse of transgender people in prison. Prior to joining Funders, Alex was a public interest career counselor for law students at UC Berkeley School of Law. He is currently a Board member for Borealis Philanthropy and the Miss Major Griffin-Gracy Educational Retreat and Historical Center. Alex is a former Soros Justice Fellow and received his JD from UC Berkeley School of Law.
Ebony Harper
Ebony Harper is one of the leaders and shining lights of Sacramento's Transgender community, formally Gender Health Center's PREP Coordinator and vital team member in GHC's Outreach, Harm Reduction, Community Organizing, and Respite programs. Her recent move to The California Endowment and appointment to the State Office of AIDS Planning Group reflects her vital and respected role in our community as a go-to contact for a broad range of needs and services, from heads of State-level agencies looking for her to speak at a program unveiling, to religious community leaders seeking Transgender cultural competence, to survival sex workers in crisis needing a shoulder to cry on and resources to get them through to tomorrow.
Morey Riordan
Morey Riordan has been involved in HIV activism and work for over 25 years and he has served as the Executive Director of four nonprofit organizations, including Women Organized to Respond to Life-threatening Disease (WORLD) and the Sperm Bank of California, a feminist sperm bank focused primarily on LGBT family creation. Morey led the effort to become the first fully licensed sperm bank in the US to accept gay men as sperm donors, despite stigma-driven opposition from the FDA and other regulators.  He then served as Vice President of Access & Innovation at AIDS United and managed several national grantmaking initiatives for nearly seven years. Following this, Morey began working as a consultant to funders and community-based organizations focused on creating a more just and equitable world.  Currently, Morey is the Founding Director of the Transgender Strategy Center (TSC), a strategic, intersectional effort informed by the lived experiences of trans people. Fully trans-led, TSC works to strengthen grassroots, trans-led organizations; host individual leadership development; and help win the program and policy changes needed to secure equity and well-being for trans communities.
12:30 pm - 1:45 pm
Academy Hall
Lunch and Sustainability Presentation
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12:30 pm - 1:45 pm
Academy Hall
Lunch and Sustainability Presentation

This afternoon, we will transition our conversations from a focus on advocacy and community, to one of sustainability. Specifically, what are the strategies that we must focus on to ensure impact over the long-term? To queue up this conversation, we have invited Greg Millett, Vice President and Director of Public Policy at amfAR, and Catherine Cook, Head of Research for Harm Reduction International, who will spotlight an issue in our crosshairs: funding for harm reduction. With recent increases in HIV among people who use drugs (PWUD) in the US due the opioid crisis and continued flat funding for harm reduction in low- and middle-income countries, understanding the gaps and opportunities in the philanthropic response to HIV among PWUD will be a critical issue for our sector.

Speakers

Greg Millett
Greg Millett is a nationally recognized epidemiologist/researcher with significant experience working in federal HIV policy development at both the White House and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). From 2009 to 2011, Mr. Millett served as a detailee in the White House Office of National AIDS Policy as a Senior Policy Advisor. In this role, he coordinated the Office’s policy and research activities, including HIV prevention policy and the federal-level inter-agency process to develop the National AIDS Strategy. Prior to joining amfAR in May 2014, Mr. Millett served as the HHS/CDC Liaison to the White House Office of National AIDS Policy. Mr. Millett has published over 40 peer-reviewed research papers. He has a Master of Public Health degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Catherine Cook
Catherine Cook joined Harm Reduction International in 2007 as Research Analyst and was appointed Harm Reduction International’s Head of Research in 2017. She now leads the research team, overseeing research initiatives on harm reduction implementation, policy and investment through the Global State of Harm Reduction programme and other projects. Catherine is a Deputy Editor for the Harm Reduction Journal. Catherine holds a BSc in Psychology from Sussex University and an Msc in Cross-Cultural Psychology from Brunel University, London. Prior to joining Harm Reduction International, Catherine worked at the International HIV/AIDS Alliance.
2:00 pm - 3:15 pm
Academy Hall
International: Learnings from Pediatric Scale-Up in Sub-Saharan Africa: How to Build Sustainability into Aggressive Growth Programs
Session designer: Children’s Investment Fund Foundation
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2:00 pm - 3:15 pm
Academy Hall
International: Learnings from Pediatric Scale-Up in Sub-Saharan Africa: How to Build Sustainability into Aggressive Growth Programs

The Children’s Investment Fund Foundation partnered with PEPFAR in an ambitious plan to double the number of children on ART in nine priority countries between 2014 and 2016. Similarly, the ELMA Foundation committed to increasing the number of children and adolescents identified, linked, and retained in treatment; and improving the quality of HIV care and treatment for children and adolescents. ELMA invested separately to accelerate testing and treatment in a number of countries in Africa. With such ambitious scale-up programs, both CIFF and ELMA commissioned Rabin Martin to evaluate whether their investments would lead to sustained change. This session will explore the results of the evaluations, what CIFF, Elma and their partners learned through the experience, and how and why private philanthropies should think about sustainability in the design of their programs.

Speakers

Taryn Barker
Taryn Barker oversees the HIV portfolio at the Children’s Investment Fund Foundation, where she focuses on adolescent HIV, designing new and managing existing investments in service delivery, advocacy, and commercial solutions. Prior to CIFF, she was the Director of Viral Hepatitis at the Clinton Health Access Initiative, where she worked to set up HCV and HBV treatment programmes in LMIC, including micro-elimination programmes for HIV/HCV co-infection programmes. She has a decade of experience in managing health programmmes in Asia, Africa and the Caribbean, primarily focused on access to medicines, devices and diagnostics for infectious diseases, family planning and maternal and neonatal health, as well as on health financing. Taryn holds an MSc in Health Economics and Policy from the London School of Economics and a degree in business from McGill University.
June Lee
June Lee is Director, Measurement and Evaluation at The ELMA Philanthropies Services. She crafts and implements measurement approaches that assess portfolio-level and grant-level impact across The ELMA Foundation’s investments in maternal and newborn health, early childhood education, pediatric HIV, and building a health and education workforce. She defines The ELMA Philanthropies’ M&E practice and principles so that evaluations are right-sized, timely, and drive learning and decision-making. She also led the strategic review of The ELMA Foundation’s grant-making and co-developed the Foundation’s Investment Framework in partnership with program staff. Before joining ELMA in 2016, June spent over 10 years at Sesame Workshop, where she was Vice President of International Research in the Strategy and Research department. She directed formative research and summative evaluations for all of Sesame Workshop’s international projects and worked with partners around the world to elevate the quality and rigor of the company’s research. She has co-edited a book and authored numerous papers on the global impact of Sesame Street. June received her Ph.D. and M.A. in Human Development and Family Sciences from The University of Texas at Austin, and her B.A. in Economics and Psychology from Davidson College.
Deborah Kaliel
Deborah Kaliel is the Acting Branch Chief for Capacity Building and Partnerships in USAID’s Office of HIV and AIDS, where she actively oversees PEPFAR’s efforts to monitor and reinforce the sustainability of health systems, including the use of PEPFAR’s Sustainability Index Development (SID) tool. Deborah has worked at USAID for 11 years and has held a number of roles with USAID’s HIV program in the United States and overseas. She also served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Paraguay before joining USAID. Deborah is a graduate of the Harvard School of Public Health and has an undergraduate degree from Amherst College.
Lauren Marks
Lauren Marks is the Director of Private Sector Engagement in the Office of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator and Health Diplomacy, which leads implementation of the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). Lauren leads the Private Sector Engagement Team to support the development, implementation, and evaluation of policies, interventions, and strategies for public private partnerships (PPPs) by working closely with country teams, implementation partners, private sector organizations, foundations, and multilateral institutions. Lauren comes to S/GAC from the private sector – Lauren managed the HIV/AIDS portfolio for Johnson & Johnson’s Corporate Contributions group. Prior to joining Johnson & Johnson, Lauren served as the Health Program/Public-Private Partnership Advisor at USAID/South Africa, where she built several successful PPPs between the US Government, the private sector, and non-governmental organizations. Lauren also worked at USAID/Washington in the Bureau for Global Health, where she provided technical support to USAID missions in several African and Asian countries.  Prior to USAID, Lauren was a corporate attorney at Nixon Peabody LLP in New York.  She has a law degree from Georgetown University and a BA from Duke University.
Stephen Lee
Stephen Lee, is the Vice President, Program Implementation and Country Management, for the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation. Dr. Lee manages the development and implementation of programs that provide prevention, care, and treatment services to individuals affected and infected by HIV/AIDS. Prior to joining EGPAF, Dr. Lee acted as senior advisor for HIV/AIDS care and treatment in the Bureau of Global Health at USAID. There, he supported HIV/AIDS care and treatment program development, evaluated existing HIV/AIDS programs and policies, and analyzed HIV/AIDS research. Additionally, he worked as an HIV/AIDS infectious disease advisor for USAID, focusing on disease prevention and monitoring throughout Europe and Eurasia. Dr. Lee has a bachelor’s degree in biology from Baylor University, a degree in medicine from Emory University School of Medicine, an MBA from Heriot Watt University and a post graduate diploma in health systems management from the University of London, School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.
Kanchana Suggu
Kanchana Suggu is the Director of eMTCT and Pediatric HIV at the Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI). In this role, she leads strategy, helps coordinates the response across various global teams working on pediatrics, and works closely with country teams to support execution of eMTCT and pediatric programs on the ground. Prior to stepping into this role, Kanchana was the Deputy Country Director in CHAI’s Liberia office, where she supported the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare to develop a national Accelerated Action Plan to Reduce Maternal and Neonatal Mortality, and establish health financing and family planning programs for CHAI in Liberia. Kanchana has been with CHAI for seven years. Earlier in her career, Kanchana worked in the private sector, mainly on financial services and consumer goods research. She received a Masters of International Affairs degree from the George Washington University, where she was a High Honors Fellow; and has a Bachelor of Commerce degree from the University of Mumbai.
2:00 pm - 3:15 pm
Vista Room
Domestic U.S.: Harm Reduction: Syringe Access and Beyond
Session Designers: AIDS Funding Collaborative and Comer Family Foundation
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2:00 pm - 3:15 pm
Vista Room
Domestic U.S.: Harm Reduction: Syringe Access and Beyond

We have a heightened risk of losing ground in our progress with the emerging HIV, HCV and opioid syndemics. The CDC has indicated 220 counties are at increased risk for another “Scott County, Indiana,” as a result of opioid use.  Our session will update HIV funders on the critical overlap of these syndemics, best practice for harm reduction services across the continuum of use and recovery, and how we should leverage resources across all “fights” to prevent further disease and death.

Speakers

Mary Pounder
Mary Pounder directs the grant making and relationship management for the Comer Family Foundation and collaborates with over 150 non-profits to make a lasting impact on the lives of individuals and communities throughout Chicago and nationwide in the areas of health care, the environment, education and arts/culture. Prior to joining the Foundation, Mary led United Healthcare’s Corporate Social Responsibility Program, directing the work of 12 markets, and has 10 years of experience leading Medicaid program implementation, process improvement, mergers and acquisitions, operations and negotiations across all business segments at a local, regional and national level. She has her Master's in Public Health from Northern Illinois University.
Tanagra Melgarejo
Tanagra Melgarejo has over 20 years of experience in the fields of organizational and program development, evaluation, technical assistance, community organizing, and direct service with underserved/vulnerable communities, particularly communities of color. She also has knowledge and experience in training, curricula development and capacity building. Her commitment and passion for harm reduction started out in Holyoke, Massachusetts in the 1990s while she worked as Popular Education Coordinator for a local HIV prevention program. Before moving to Oakland, she was working in Puerto Rico with women who are survivors of gender based violence, focusing her work and activism around economic, human rights and protection of the rights of LGBTQ people. Tanagra holds a Master’s degree in Social Work from the University of Puerto Rico.
Greg Millett
Greg Millett is a nationally recognized epidemiologist/researcher with significant experience working in federal HIV policy development at both the White House and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). From 2009 to 2011, Mr. Millett served as a detailee in the White House Office of National AIDS Policy as a Senior Policy Advisor. In this role, he coordinated the Office’s policy and research activities, including HIV prevention policy and the federal-level inter-agency process to develop the National AIDS Strategy. Prior to joining amfAR in May 2014, Mr. Millett served as the HHS/CDC Liaison to the White House Office of National AIDS Policy. Mr. Millett has published over 40 peer-reviewed research papers. He has a Master of Public Health degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Shawn Ryan
Shawn Ryan has practiced for over 10 years in Greater Cincinnati, where he became aware of the impact of heroin and other opioids, and has worked tirelessly to make a difference in that community. Dr. Ryan serves on local, state, and national committees and workgroups focused on turning the tide of the opioid epidemic.  He is the past president of the Ohio Society of Addiction Medicine and the Chair of Payer Relations for the American Society for Adolescent Medicine (ASAM).  Dr. Ryan is one of the founders of BrightView – a patient-centered, evidence-based addiction treatment organization, currently with 7 centers in Southern Ohio. He attended medical school at the University of Kentucky, completing his residency in emergency medicine and MBA at the University of Cincinnati. He is board certified in addiction and emergency medicine.
3:15 pm - 3:30 pm
Break
3:30 pm - 4:45 pm
Academy Hall
Closing Plenary: We have nothing to lose but our chains - Toward a Racial Justice Framework for the HIV Justice Movement
Sponsored by Ford Foundation
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3:30 pm - 4:45 pm
Academy Hall
Closing Plenary: We have nothing to lose but our chains - Toward a Racial Justice Framework for the HIV Justice Movement

In 2017, in recognition of the importance of elevating racial justice in the HIV response, the Elton John AIDS Foundation and Ford Foundation jointly funded a meeting co-convened by Counter Narrative Project and Positive Women’s Network-USA. From that meeting, HIV Racial Justice Now!, a national coalition of people of color leaders has emerged to develop a framework and action plans to sustain and uplift this work. This session will engage participants around integrating a racial justice analysis and framework in the HIV movement.  Recognizing the rich history and powerful legacy of leaders of color in the HIV movement, this session sees our current moment as building on the efforts of our foremothers and fathers. Although HIV has always been an epidemic that devastates Black, brown, and indigenous communities, the HIV response has not historically been grounded in a deep understanding of the ways the epidemic and response are shaped by white supremacy. This session will feature five HIV movement leaders from the Black, Latinx, and Asian/Pacific Islander community discussing the theory and praxis of racial justice in the HIV community. Through moderated discussion and storytelling, speakers will define and explain racial justice; describe, from a grantee perspective, what racial justice looks like in organizations, agencies, and funder practices; and propose priority strategies and innovations for the field to realign with a racial justice orientation.

By the end of this session participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the importance of centering racial justice in HIV movement work.
  • Describe ways that white supremacy is structured into organizations and institutions.
  • Understand strategies to elevate people of color in HIV movement leadership.
  • Envision strategies and practices that funders may be able to adopt to support racial justice within the HIV movement.

Speakers

Charles Stephens
Charles Stephens is the Founder and Executive Director of the Counter Narrative Project. Prior to founding the Counter Narrative Project, Charles organized the historic 2014 Whose Beloved Community: Black Civil and LGBT Rights conference at Emory University. His work as an advocate and nonprofit leader has been recognized by Georgia State University, where he was awarded the College of Arts and Sciences Outstanding Alumni Award in 2018 and the Gentlemen’s Foundation which awarded him the Gentleman of Service Award in 2017. The Counter Narrative Project under his leadership was awarded the Red Door Foundation Organization Award and the Spark Reproductive Justice Now Vanguard of Change award. In addition to his work as an organizer and advocate, his writings have appeared in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Atlanta Magazine, and Creative Loafing. Black Gay Genius: Answering Joseph Beam, an anthology he co-edited was a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award.
Cecilia Chung
Cecilia Chung, Senior Director of Strategic Projects at Transgender Law Center, is an internationally recognized leader who advocates for HIV/AIDS awareness and access to care, LGBT equality and equity, and human rights. Cecilia has been a vocal advocate for transgender women and people living with HIV. In 2002, she joined the Board of the Asian Pacific Islander Wellness Center and currently consults with them on an innovative mobile HIV testing project for transgender youth. In 2004, as a founding producer of Trans March, she organized one of the world’s largest annual transgender events which has since been replicated in cities across the U.S. In 2005, she became the first Deputy Director of the Transgender Law Center and is widely credited with shaping the organization’s mission and programs. In 2013, Cecilia was appointed to the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS. In 2015, Cecilia launched Positively Trans, a national, constituents-led project that focus on policy advocacy and leadership development of transgender people living with HIV, especially transgender women of color.
Venita Ray
Venita Ray is an attorney with a passion for social and racial justice, advocacy and equity. Venita currently serves as the deputy director of the Positive Women’s Network-USA, a national membership organization for women living with HIV.  Venita served as the public policy manager for Legacy Community Health, a federally qualified health center in Houston, TX, where she monitored HIV related health policy and managed an advocacy training program for people living with HIV.  Venita advocates and speaks on a number of local and national issues impacting the HIV community and in 2016 led a citywide effort to end the HIV epidemic in Houston. Venita is a founding member of the Texans Living with HIV Network, HIV Racial Justice Now and the Texas chapter of PWN-USA. Venita was diagnosed with HIV in 2003 and is deeply committed to issues like HIV criminalization, meaningful involvement of people living with HIV and racial justice.
Marco Castro-Bojorquez
Marco Castro-Bojorquez is an activist-filmmaker who advocates for the civil and human rights of LGBT people and people living with HIV/AIDS as a member of the U.S. People Living with HIV Caucus, and a lead organizer with the coalition of Californians for HIV Criminalization Reform. He is also a senior advisor for Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement, MAVEN and Somos Familia, organizations that work with queer youth and their families in the United States. This past year and in response to the success of his latest documentary El Canto del Colibrí (The Hummingbird’s Song) that explores family acceptance and immigration, he co-founded a pilot project in Sinaloa, Mexico named Corazón Abierto (project open heart) that supports family and LGBT acceptance in the region. Marco affirms that while Latinx are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS at alarming rates, they are underrepresented in the HIV/AIDS field. He is working at facilitating the formation of Venas Abiertas (open veins): A Network of Latinx Immigrant People Living with HIV in the U.S. with the hope to fight isolation and create powerful solidarity"
Larry Walker
Larry Scott-Walker, Baltimore native, is an author, artist and activist who has had a passion for community from an early age.  Larry moved to Atlanta, GA in 1998 to attend Morehouse College where he would major in African American Studies with a minor in Theater and go on cofound the first and only GSA (Gay Straight Alliance) in the school's history, Safe Space.  In 2004 Larry's play "Reality Amplified" was featured in Jomandi Theater's “Black Diamond Series” and performed in Atlanta.  Larry returned to Baltimore in 2006 where he began work with the Portal Community Center, the city's only Black gay center at the time, as their Programs Manager.  While in Baltimore Larry wrote a column called "Unboxed with Ajar" for the Baltimore OUTLOUD newspaper, held a seat on Baltimore’s Gay Pride planning committee and the City’s Rapid Response Team through the Baltimore AIDS Administration.  Larry returned to Atlanta in 2011 with his sights fixed on continuing the work of championing for the lives of Black gay men. December 12, 2012, Larry published his first book, a compilation of Black gay love poetry, entitled "Love Equation: Pain + Pleasure = Poetry."  November 2013, Larry began working with AID Atlanta's Evolution Project as their Activities and Recruitment Coordinator.  Through his work with Evolution, Larry began to see his passion for HIV advocacy deepen with his acceptance of his own HIV-Positive status.  Larry would publish his second book of poetry in March 2014, Love Equation Vol. 2.  In 2015, at the request of his colleague Daniel Driffin, Larry took on the task of revamping a support group for Black gay men living with HIV in the Atlanta area.  The method used to galvanize and mobilize was so successful that Larry, along with his 2 colleagues, coined the “Undetectables support model” and began to present at conferences around the country on its efficiency.  In 2015, Larry along with Dwain Bridges and Daniel Driffin established THRIVE Support Services Inc., a nonprofit organization with the mission of serving the purpose of support, through lessening gaps of disparities, advocacy through mobilizing and improving health equity for Black gay men living with HIV. To date, THRIVE Support Services Inc is connected to over 3,300 Black men living with HIV, has linked over 2,000 people living with HIV to healthcare and support services and has the largest network of Black gay men living with HIV in the Southeastern United States.
4:45 pm - 5:00 pm
Academy Hall
Closing Remarks
John Barnes

Sponsors

We owe a special debt of gratitude to the following organizations and individuals who gave very generously of their time and resources to ensure the success of this meeting. Please also learn more about our fantastic Program Committee here. If you’re interested in becoming a sponsor of the FCAA Sponsor, please review this memo and contact Sarah Hamilton at sarah@fcaaids.org.

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